The Inquisition in the Spanish Dependencies: Sicily, Naples, Sardinia, Milan, the Canaries, Mexico, Peru, New Granada

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 10, 2010 - History - 584 pages
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Henry Charles Lea's account of the Inquisition in Italy, Spain and South America was first published in 1908. Drawing on primary source material, the American historian gives a detailed account of the workings of the Inquisition and its individual tribunals in Sicily, Naples, Sardinia and Milan. He also describes the Inquisition in Malta, the Canary Islands, Mexico, Peru, New Granada and the Philippines. According to Lea the Inquisition persisted from the sixteenth right up to the nineteenth century. He demonstrates how some of the individuals entrusted with implementing the Inquisition abused their powers, and how the Inquisition in the Spanish colonies prevented the efficient running of governmental administrations. He focuses on some of the consequences of the Inquisition: Jews were banished from Naples, there were moves to exclude new Christians from the Church in Mexico, and the mysticism practised in New Granada was considered a grave threat to the Church.
  

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Contents

Chapter ISicily
1
It gradually becomes efficient
7
Complaints of Sicilian Parliament
13
Renewed Complaints of the Parliament
21
Enormous Increase in Number of Familiars
27
Distance renders it partially Independent 203
28
Increased Aggressiveness of the Tribunal
33
The Inquisition under Austrian RuleAuto de Fe of 1724
42
Auto de Fe of 1659
234
Inertia during the Rest of the Century
240
Quarrels with BishopsCase of Bishop Palafox
257
Exemption from Military Service
263
Decadence of the Tribunal
269
Prosecution of Miguel Hidalgo
276
Suppression in 1813
288
Extinction in 1820
297

Episcopal Inquisition under Bishop Cubelles
45
Refugees from Spain
51
Popular Opposition becomes uncontrollable
58
Inertness of the Papal Inquisition
65
Tentative Efforts create popular Excitement
71
Recrudescence of PersecutionThe Roman Inquisition tacitly
78
The Apulian Waldenses
85
Gradual EncroachmentA Commissioner of the Roman Inqui
92
Commissioner Piazza banished in 1671
99
Episcopal Inquisition suppressedArchbishop Spinelli forced
107
Decadent condition of the tribunal
114
Chapter IVMilan
121
abandons the Project
128
The Roman Inquisition perfectedIts Struggle to exclude Swiss
135
PAGE
139
It is reorganized in 1567 and rendered independent of Seville
145
Prosecution of escaped Negro and Moorish Slaves
152
Prosecution of Judaizers
158
Sorcery and Superstitions
165
Censorship
176
Popular hostilityOpposition to Sanbenitos in Churches
188
Episcopal Inquisition
197
Autos of 1575 1576 1577 1578 1579 1590 1596 and 1601
207
Comparative Inaction in the first Half of the Seventeenth Century
226
Trivial Results
304
Audacity of the Commissioners
311
Records burnt in 1763
317
The Tribunal established January 29 1570
326
Supervision over Foreigners
332
FinancesInitial PovertySpeedy Growth of Confiscations
342
Abusive use of arbitrary Power
355
Paralysis of the TribunalPurchase of Offices
372
Conflicts of Jurisdictions
382
Quarrels of Inquisitor Amusqufbar with Archbishop Barroeta
389
Punishments 437
437
Censorship
444
Reestablishment in 1815 290
448
Work accomplished
451
Extent of DistrictAttempt to include Florida
457
InertiaSack of Cartagena in 1697
467
Quarrels with the Authorities
473
Visitation of Dr Martin Real in 1643Its Failure
480
Internal and external Quarrels continue
488
Humiliation of Governor Ceballos
498
The Revolutionary Junta banishes the Tribunal in 1810
506
Appendix op Documents
517
Prosecution of Jose Maria Morelos 292
554
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