Anthropological Theory

Front Cover
Robert Alan Manners, David Kaplan
Transaction Publishers - Social Science - 590 pages
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Anthropological theory has been much discussed in recent years, yet the crucial questions still remain--how can it be defined, how is it developed, how is it to be applied, and how can one confirm it? The editors of Anthropological Theory answer these questions by presenting essays relating to various aspects of anthropological theory. Their selections from widely scattered and often difficult-to-obtain sources present a comprehensive set of writings that describe the current position and issues involved in theory.

The development of field work in anthropology generated a tremendous emphasis on empirical data and research. The plethora of information awaiting collection and the enthusiasm with which the field embraced it so immersed anthropologists that they were unable to relate this new information to the field as a whole. Manners and Kaplan believe that this lack of generalization had a profoundly negative effect upon the discipline. Therefore, they look closely into the relationship between field work and theory in an opening essay and go on to present material that demonstrates the value and the necessity of theory in anthropology. Essays by anthropologists and other social scientists deal with "explanation," evolution, ecology, ideology, structuralism, and a number of other issues reflecting throughout the editors' conviction that anthropology is a science, the goal of which is to produce generalizations about sociocultural phenomena.

The book provides necessary perspective for examining and evaluating the crucial intellectual concerns of modern anthropology and will therefore be important for the work of every anthropologist.

Robert A. Manners (1913-1996) received his Ph.D. from Columbia University and carried on field work in the Caribbean, among American Indians in the Southwest, and in East Africa. He wrote numerous articles and reviews for anthropological journals as well as many books. He was professor of anthropology, Brandeis University where he started up the department.

David Kaplan is professor emeritus of anthropology at Brandeis University. He has contributed articles and reviews to various journals. He has also done field work in Mexico and his areas of specialty include economic anthropology, method and theory, and peasant culture of Mesoamerica.

  

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Contents

Notes on Theory and NonTheory in Anthropology
1
On the Concept of Culture Leslie A White
15
The Difficulties Achievements and Limitations of Social Anthropology
31
Past and Present E E EvansPritchard
46
Social Anthropology and the Method of Controlled Comparison
54
On Explanation John Hospers
69
The Natural Science Ideal in the Social Sciences Lewis White Beck
80
Explanation and Comparative Dynamics in Social Science
89
IndianEuropean Relations in Colonial Latin America
285
Closed Corporate Peasant Communities in Mesoamerica
294
The Influence of Linguistics on Early Culture and Personality Theory
303
Personality and Social Structure Bert Kaplan
318
Behavioral Evolution and the Emergence of the Self
342
Cultural and Cognitive Discontinuity Ulric Neisser
354
The Study of Cultural Ecology
367
The Frontier in History Owen Lattimore
374

The Phenomenological and Naturalistic Approaches to the Social
97
An Essay
105
Understanding and Explanation in Social Anthropology
115
An Operational Concept
127
Some Observations and Queries Li Anche
136
A Chinese Phase in Social Anthropology Maurice Freedman
145
Functionalism Realpolitik and Anthropology in Underdeveloped Areas
156
Some Criticisms of Cultural Relativism Paul F Schmidt
169
Observation and Generalization in Cultural Anthropology
175
Residence Rules Ward H Goodenough
181
Conflict and Congruence in Anthropological Theory
193
Functional Analysis of Change Francesca Cancian
204
Function and Cause Ronald Philip Dore
212
On Social Structure S F Nadel
220
B Evolution
229
Evolution and Process Julian H Steward
241
On the Evolution of Social Stratification and the State
251
Language and Evolution Joseph H Greenberg
260
History
269
Some Issues in the Logic of Historical Analysis Ernest Nagel
276
Ecologic Relations of Ethnic Groups in Swat North Pakistan
386
Parallel Process in Acculturation
393
Sociological Aspects of the Relation between Language and Culture
411
Language Thought and Culture Paul Henle
421
The Views of Benjamin Lee Whorf Max Black
432
Belief and Knowledge Godfrey Lienhardt
438
Social Beliefs and Individual Thinking in Tribal Society Max Gluckman
453
On Norms and Values Judith Blake and Kingsley Davis
465
Structuralism and Formal Analysis
473
Studies in Ethnoscience William C Sturtevant
475
The Psychic Unity of Human Groups Anthony F C Wallace
500
The Ethnographic Study of Cognitive Systems Charles O Frake
507
Gods Truth or HocusPocus? Robbins Burling
514
Some Comments on Formal Analysis of Grammatical and Semantic Systems Muriel Hammer
523
Structural Analysis in Linguistics and Anthropology Claude LeviStrauss
530
Claude LeviStraussAnthropologist and Philosopher Edmund Leach
541
On the Work of Claude LeviStrauss Clifford Geertz
551
Selected Bibliography
559
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