Contact

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, 1997 - Fiction - 434 pages
72 Reviews
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In December, 1999, a multinational team journeys out to the stars, to the most awesome encounter in human history. Who -- or what -- is out there?
In Cosmos, Carl Sagan explained the universe. In Contact, he predicts its future -- and our own.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - macleod73 - LibraryThing

What a book. For someone with a vast intellect as Sagan to be able to write a book that is so approachable by all is a feat unto itself. He writes with a wonder that was visible during the "Cosmos ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bdgamer - LibraryThing

This book was wow. Simply wow. It's very technical at times, which isn't surprising considering it's a book about scientists by a scientist, but it offers up philosophical, cultural, and sociological ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

PARTI THE MESSAGE
1
Transcendental Numbers
3
Coherent Light
15
White Noise
39
Prime Numbers
59
Decryption Algorithm
73
Palimpsest
89
The Ethanol in W3
109
Babylon
211
Harmonic Oscillator
231
Erbium Dowel
253
The Elders of Ozone
277
The Dream of the Ants
295
Superunification
313
THE GALAXY
325
Naked Singularity
327

Random Access
125
The Numinous
143
THE MACHINE
155
Precession of the Equinoxes
157
The World Message Consortium
175
The OneDelta Isomer
197
Grand Central Station
343
Causality
373
Gilgamesh
393
Reprogramming
401
The Artists Signature
423
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Carl Sagan

The books of Carl Sagan, the distinguished astronomer, are the most widely read scientific works in the world. Cosmos, first published in 1980, is the bestselling science book ever published in the English language. The accompanying Peabody and Emmy Award winning television series was broadcast in sixty countries. His other books include The Dragons of Eden, awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1978, Broca's Brain, and the bestseller (with Ann Druyan), Comet.

Dr. Sagan was deeply involved in both spacecraft exploration of the planets and the radio search for extraterrestrial intelligence. His numerous awards included the NASA medals for Exceptional Scientific Achievement and for Distinguished Public Service, the John F. kennedy Astronautics Award, the Honda Prize, the Joseph Priestly Award "for distinguished contributions to the welfare of mankind," and the National Academy of Science Public Service Medal. The National Science Foundation states his "research revolutionized planetary science...his gifts to mankind were infinite."

Dr. Sagan was the David Duncan Professor of Astronomy and Space Sciences at Cornell University, where he also served as director of the Laboratory for Planetary Studies at the Center for Radiophysics and Space Research. He died in 1996.

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