Fighting Ships and Prisons: The Mediterranean Galleys of France in the Age of Louis XIV

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U of Minnesota Press, 1973 - 380 pages

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Contents

Introduction
3
The Uses of Galleys
10
Limitations of the Oar
31
The Base at Marseilles
52
Building and Victualing the Galley Corps
68
Officers and the Crown
95
Chaplains Lower Officers and Freeman Crew
114
The Procurement of Slaves
138
Life Ashore
225
Releases and Escapes
250
The Transition to Prisons
272
Conclusions and Reflections
298
Glossary
319
Notes
327
Bibliography
353
Index
363

Condemnations to the Oar
173
Life Aboard
200

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Page 356 - Relation des tourments qu'on fait souffrir aux Protestants qui sont sur les galères de France; faite par Jean Bion, oy devant Prêtre et curé d'TTrsy, ancien Aumônier de la galère nommée la Superbe.
Page viii - My debt to the staffs of the British Museum, the Public Record Office and the National Library of Scotland will be obvious to all who have worked there.
Page 294 - All have a coat, waistcoat, trousers, two shirts, and a pair of shoes, given them every year; and a great-coat every two years. They had good brown bread, well baked, in loaves weighing a pound and threequarters. All had some little allowance in money, and to those who worked was granted an additional allowance of three sous every day for wine.
Page 360 - Note sur le recrutement et la libération des galériens sous Louis XIV au début du ministère de Colbert," Revue d'histoire moderne et contemporaine, XI (1908-1909), 35-53.
Page 92 - ... opinion appears prevalent that an education should be obtained in such a school in a year's time, and that men who enter it ignorant, debased, with no sense of the value of knowledge, and with no mental habits adapted to its pursuit, are to be sent forth competent readers, penmen and arithmeticians in the space of a few months, or a year or two at farthest. In institutions like the Detroit house of correction, the short sentences of the men are, in most cases, a sufficient bar to any extensive...
Page 294 - ... thieves; these last are always branded before they leave the prison of the place where they were condemned; some with the letter V (for voleur) others with GAL on the left shoulder. "These galleys had only one deck. Many of their windows in the roofs were open; and, being swept twice every day, they were clean, and not offensive.
Page 5 - Louis especially encouraged warfare between the English and the Dutch on the one hand, and the infidels of North Africa on the other. Louis' was a complicated, but shrewdly self-interested policy.

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