Speaking in Queer Tongues: Globalization and Gay Language

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University of Illinois Press, 2004 - Social Science - 288 pages
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According to William Leap, language is a fundamental tool for shaping identity and community, including the expression (or repression) of sexual desire. 'Speaking in Queer Tongues' investigates the tensions and adaptations that occur when processes of globalization bring one system of gay or lesbian language into contact with another. Western constructions of gay culture are circulating widely beyond the boundaries of Western nations due to influences as diverse as Internet communication, global dissemination of entertainment and other media, increased travel and tourism, migration, displacement, and transnational citizenship. The authority claimed by these constructions, and by the linguistic codes embedded in them, is causing them to have a impact on public and private expressions of homosexuality in locations as diverse as sub-Saharan Africa, New Zealand, Indonesia, and Israel. Examining a wide range of global cultures, 'Speaking in Queer Tongues' presents essays on topics that include old versus modern sexual vocabularies, the rhetoric of gay-oriented magazines and news media, verbal and nonverbalized sexual imagery in poetry and popular culture, and the linguistic consequences of the globalized gay rights movement.
 

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Contents

II
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III
46
IV
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V
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VI
134
VII
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VIII
181
IX
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X
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XI
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XII
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Page 5 - A social process in which the constraints of geography on social and cultural arrangements recede and in which people become increasingly aware that they are receding.
Page 10 - The rallying point for the counterattack against the deployment of sexuality ought not to be sexdesire, but bodies and pleasures.
Page 1 - As with translation of a text, one does not simply get a reproduction of identity. The acquisition of new forms of language from the modern west— whether by forcible imposition, insidious insertion, or voluntary borrowing— is part of what makes for new possibilities of action in non-Western societies.

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About the author (2004)

William L. Leap is professor of anthropology at The American University. He is the author of books including "American Indian English" and "Word Is Out: Gay Men's English," and the editor of such works as "Beyond the Lavender Lexicon: Authenticity, Representation, and Imagination in Lesbian and Gay Discourse.

Tom Boellstorff is professor of anthropology at the University of California, Irvine.

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