The Criminal Prosecution and Capital Punishment of Animals

Front Cover
The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 1998 - History - 384 pages
0 Reviews
Can an Animal Commit a Crime? This pioneering work collects an amazing assemblage of court cases in which animals have been named as defendants--chickens, rats, field mice, bees, gnats, and (in 34 recorded instances) pigs, among others-- providing insight into such modern issues as animal rights, capital punishment, and social and criminal theory. Evans suggests an intriguing distinction between trials of specific animals or particular crimes, such as the "murder" of an infant by a pig, and trials for larger, catastrophic events, such as plagues and infestations. In the latter case, Evans suggests a parallel to witchcraft. Edward Payson Evans [1831-1917], a historian, linguist and associate of Ralph Waldo Emerson, taught at the University of Michigan before moving to Germany, where he became a specialist in Oriental languages and German literature. A prolific author, his other Animal-related books are Animal Symbolism in Art and Literature and Animal Symbolism in Ecclesiastical Architecture, both published in 1887. CONTENTS Introduction 1. Bugs and Beasts before the Law 2. Mediaeval and Modern Penology Appendix Bibliography Index
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
18
III
193
IV
259
V
287
VI
307
VII
309
VIII
311
IX
313
XIV
342
XV
344
XVI
346
XVII
352
XVIII
354
XIX
356
XX
358
XXI
360

X
335
XI
336
XII
338
XIII
340
XXII
361
XXIII
362
XXIV
373
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 43 - And God said, Let the earth bring forth the living creature after his kind, cattle, and creeping things, and beast of the earth after his kind: and it was so.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information