The Medicinal Plants of the Philippines

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P. Blakiston's son & Company, 1901 - Health & Fitness - 269 pages
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The Medicinal Plants of the Philippines (1901) T.H. Pardo De Tavera translated by Jerome B. Thomas, Jr. A.B., M.D.
 

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Page 231 - Pharmacopma, of India, the root has been made official as an emetic, nauseant, and diaphoretic ; directions for making a juice and syrup are given : the former to be given in doses of 2...
Page 219 - ... organs. Probably an infusion of the dried leaves or an extract prepared from the green plant, would retain all its active properties. The dose of the expressed juice, for an infant, is a teaspoonful.' " (Pharm Ind.) A decoction of the leaves is given in earache ; a cataplasm of the leaves is applied as a local application to syphilitic ulcers, and as a means of relieving the pain of snake-bite. (Drury.) According to Nimmo the roots "attract cats quite as much as those of valerian.
Page 239 - The individual scybala usually vary in size from that of a hazelnut to that of a walnut, and are frequently provided with one or two indentations which represent impressions of the tenia of the colon.
Page v - This work was written with the special object of facilitating the study of the native medicinal plants by the numerous medical officers stationed at small posts throughout the Philippines. The...
Page 106 - Cut in strips and beaten thoroughly between stones it is sold under the name of ' gogo ' ; it is macerated in water, to which it imparts a reddish colour, and forms a substitute for soap. The Filipinos use this preparation for bathing, especially the hair, for which purpose there is no more useful or simple preparation. It cures pityriasis, and renders the hair very soft, without drying it too much as is usually the case with soap. The natives use it in treating the itch, washing the affected parts...
Page 219 - Ross speaks highly of its use as an expectorant, ranking it in this respect with Senega; he found it especially useful in the bronchitis of children. He reports also favorably of a cataplasm of the leaves as a local application to syphilitic ulcers ; and as a means of relieving the pain and irritation attendant on the bites of venomous insects. The alleged purgative action of the root noticed by Ainslic (Mat.
Page 106 - The use made of the mashed bark of this tree is well known throughout the Philippines. Cut in strips and beaten thoroughly between stones it is sold under the name of ' gogo ' ; it is macerated in water, to which it imparts a reddish colour, and forms a substitute for soap. The Filipinos use this preparation for bathing, especially the hair, for which purpose there is no more useful or simple preparation. It cures pityriasis, and renders the hair very soft, without drying it too much as is usually...
Page 231 - Editor, he remarks that it is a good emetic and diaphoretic whenever ipecacuanha is not at hand, but that it should be regarded, not so much as a substitute for that article, as a resource in case of need.] (Non-qffifinal.) Agave Americana, Linn.
Page 202 - When the seeds are taken with wine, sensation is so dulled that the drinker may be whipped without feeling the lashes, and even if put to the torment, does not feel it.
Page 180 - The above facts serve as arms for the opponents of the habit ; the robust who smoke and drink to excess and meet with an accidental death on a railroad or from an acute disease that overtakes them in the midst of perfect health, serve as arguments for the defenders, to prove the innocence of the custom.

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