The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages: Volume 1, Salerno, Bologna, Paris

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 2, 2010 - History - 600 pages
Hastings Rashdall (1858-1924) first published The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages in 1895. It has remained one of the best-known studies of the great medieval universities for over a century. Volume 1 contains detailed studies of the universities of Salerno, Bologna and Paris with in-depth analysis of their origins and constitutions, institutional development and specialised curriculum. It also includes sections on what a medieval university was; the learning and curriculum of the Dark Ages; the twelfth-century Renaissance; the respective places of Plato and Aristotle in the medieval curriculum; the development of Scholasticism; and the figures of Peter Abelard, Peter the Lombard, and John of Salisbury. Rashdall's study was one of the first comparative works on the subject. Its scope and breadth has ensured its place as a key work of intellectual history, and an indispensable tool for the study of the educational organisation of the Middle Ages.
 

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I have been studying medieval theology for the past two years and have come to the realization that the university system has been given to the world as a gift from God. The university system has developed the human intellect and has been guided by God's grace through the Roman Catholic church and the Papacy. Rashdall's book magnificently describes the origins of the university system and is very detailed in its description of the original schools, leaders, and promoters. 

Contents

Voting by Nations in Faculty of Arts 49
4
The jus ubique docendi II
11
Relation of Studium Generale to Universitas
17
CHAPTER II
23
The new birth of European intellect c 10OO A D its causes
30
Influence of Aristotle and Plato
37
Roscellinus
47
Peter the Lombard
57
The Place of Bologna in the History of Culture
254
Influence of the Civil and Canon Law
260
Downfall of Scholasticism completed by Positive Science which
266
The Origins of the University
271
The University an outgrowth not of monastic Schools but
277
the Guild
284
Multiplication of Masters at Paris especially of young Masters
291
Gradual emergence of the University into a recognized legal
300

the School
64
Heresy counteracted by orthodox Aristotelianism and especially
69
Revival of Medicine
75
Edict of Frederick II 1231
84
Contrast between the Transalpine and the Cisalpine Renaissance
91
Alleged discovery of the Pandects at Amalfi in 1135
99
Rome Pavia Ravenna
106
Pepo
112
The Irnerian epoch
122
Gratian and the Canon
128
Gratian and his Decretum
129
Relation of the Canon Law to the Civil Law and gradual
136
The Origines of the Jurist Universities
144
Four or more original Universities gradually reduced to
156
Date and gradual evolution of the StudentUniversities c 1190
163
Opposition of the City and consequent migrations of Professors
169
History of the Statutes
175
Professorial jurisdiction
182
Decay of the Rectorship
189
The Taxatores Hosfiiciorum
193
The Colleges and their democratic organization
199
The Organization of the Studium
206
Growth of the close Professoriate due to
213
Glosses Repetitions and Disputations
221
Graduation fees presents and banquet
230
the College of Doctors
237
Relation of Medical Doctors to Doctors of Philosophy Astro
241
The Curriculum in 1 Medicine and Surgery
247
Salaries and Fees 250
250
Suit between Chancellor and University beginning c 1210 leads
309
Frequent Schisms between the Nations
320
Gradual emergence of the Rector of the Artists into Head of
327
Composition of the Four Nations 315
332
Dependence of Theological Faculty on Chancellor
333
The Mendicants and the University
345
History of this recovery
351
Further history of the translations
358
Averroes and Averroism
368
The Peciarii Stationarii and Correctores peciarium 1
369
Three FriarDoctors refuse to obey Cessation ordered by Uni
375
Wholesale excommunication of the University which thereupon
381
Resistance of the seculars gradually collapses
387
Constitution and Privileges of the University
393
The Rectors Court and jurisdiction
399
Drinking of Surplus
411
The Chirurgeons
418
The Studies of Paris
426
The Colleges of Paris
478
College des Dixhuit 1180
484
The term Sorbonne applied to Theological Faculty
490
admission of Guests Pensioners
498
Legislation of 1452 about Colleges and Paedagogies
504
Colleges de plein exercice
507
List of Colleges founded before 1500 A D
514
In matters of Theology it held the balance between the rival
528
growth of antipapal
535
Growth of Gallicanism since the time of Philip IV
542
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