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grand centre of attraction, as the fullest expression of His love, throughout eternity."

But there is another aspect of the cross of our adorable Lord and Saviour which demands our most profound consideration, and that is as the foundation of our practical discipleship and testimony. We must never forget that the same cross which connects me with God, has separated me from the world. A dead man is, evidently, done with the world; and hence the believer, having died with Christ, is done with the world, in spirit and principle, though in it, of course, as regards the fact of his condition. He died in Christ; and, having risen with Christ, he is connected with God, in the power of a new life, a new nature. Being thus inseparably linked with Christ, he, of necessity, participates in His acceptance with God, and in His rejection by the world. The two things go together. The former makes him a worshipper and a citizen in heaven; the latter makes him a witness and a stranger on earth. That brings him inside the veil; this puts him outside the camp.

The one is as perfect as the other, and each should have its due effect upon the character and conduct. If the cross has come between me and my sins, it has just as really come between me and the world. If it has, for ever, cancelled all my guilt, and struck the crushing burden from my agonised conscience, it has also snapped every link which bound me to this present evil world. If it has procured me the full and everlasting remission of my sins, it has also secured the thorough condemnation of sin—the judgment of my sinful nature—the utter rejection of my sinful self. If it has brought me into

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the place of perfect peace with God; it has also called me into the place of warfare with the world, the flesh and the devil.

Now, we should clearly understand, and rightly distinguish between, both the above aspects of the cross of Christ. If we fail in our apprehension of either, there must be a corresponding defect in our character and walk. We should not profess to enjoy the one, while we refuse to enter into the other. If the ear is open to hear Christ's voice within the veil, it should be open also to hear His voice outside the camp. If we enjoy the precious atonement which the cross has accomplished, we should also accept the rejection which it necessarily involves. The former flows out of the part which God had in the cross; the latter, out of the part which man had therein. All this is involved in the glorious doctrine of the

Well therefore might the blessed apostle say, “God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by which the world is crucified unto me, and I unto the world.” Paul looked upon the world as a crucified thing; and the world, in having crucified Christ, had crucified all who belong to Him. Hence there is a double crucifixion as regards the believer and the world; and if this were more fully entered into, it would prove the utter impossibility of amalgamating the two.

Beloved Christian reader, let us deeply, honestly and prayerfully ponder these things. May we seek a fuller understanding of these two grand aspects of the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, so that our course, as Christians, may be more thoroughly decided, our

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devotedness to Christ more distinct and unequivocal, while we wait and long for that blissful moment when we shall see Him as He is, and be like Him and with Him for ever! God, in His infinite goodness, grant it for Jesus Christ's sake!

THE SANCTUARY AND THE SEA.

PSALM LXXVII.

WHILE the book of Psalms is, no doubt, the expression of the state of the God-fearing remnant of Israel in the latter day, and of Messiah’s association with them, it also serves—as no other part of scripture does—as the expression of individual godliness and personal communion in all ages. When the difference between Jewish ground-righteousness—as seen in the Psalms,

-, and Christian ground-grace—as seen in the Epistles, is well understood, what can be more refreshing, more nourishing, or more expressive of a deep-toned Christianity, than many of the divine breathings in the Psalms ? Many of them, no doubt, are the breathings of the spirit of Christ in the suffering remnant, and of Christ Himself in sympathy with them. What a cordial to the heart, especially when under trial, persecution, or distress of any kind, are the inspired utterances of a deep, inward piety, a longing desire after God,

to Him, and confident dependence on Him! Eternal life, of course, is essentially the same in the Jew as in the Christian; though the relations of the latter are much higher and wider than those of the former.

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And the Christian must also bear in mind, when reading the Psalms, that some of the expressions which were consistent with Jewish condition, would be positive unbelief for him to use—such as verse 7 of this psalm. · Will the Lord cast off for ever? and will he be favourable no more ?” The Jews are cast off as regards their national position and privileges; but not as regards the councils of God, as Paul plainly teaches in Romans xi. : “I say then, hath God cast away his people ? God forbid.” But the Christian knows that God will never cast him off; and such a thought, even for a moment, should never cross his mind; though, alas! such thoughts will intrude, and may happen at an unguarded moment, with any one. But we can conceive of no deeper anguish for a soul to pass through in this life, than to be without the sense of the favour of God, when under His chastening hand. And this must always be the result when the shield is lowered, and the heart exposed to the fiery darts of the wicked. The Christian must never forget that he stands in present favour—the unchanging and unchangeable favour of God. This is his shield of faith. Whoever, whatever, else may change, the favour in which he stands knows no change. This must be held in the integrity of a faith which hangs on the word of God, though everything may appear to be going against him, and when there may be nothing else to rest upon.

Even the pious Jew, in this most touching psalm, thinks of former mercies; recollects how gracious God is, and turns to Him. “And I said, This is my in

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firmity: but I will remember the years of the right hand of the Most High. I will remember the works of the Lord: surely I will remember thy wonders of old. I will meditate also of all thy work, and talk of thy doings. Thy way, O God, is in the sanctuary : who is so great a God as our God?” This is Jewish, not christian experience, though the Christian, in measure, may sometimes pass through it. But this would be failure. There can be no interruption to the divine favour. But if the soul be communing with itself, indulging its own thoughts, and reasoning about its own troubles, in place of looking to God, and communing with Him in the sanctuary, it is sure to fall back into Jewish experience; and every Christian is exposed to this perplexity, in degree, who knows not God as He reveals Himself in the sanctuary.

There only God is known, as He has revealed Himself in the Person and work of the blessed Lord. There only we learn His thoughts and purposes towards us, even before the foundation of the world. It is God's speaking-place; and, through the power of the Holy Ghost, above the distracting influences of this present scene, the soul is silent, and listens to His voice through the word. And now the will is bowed, His way is seen to be in accordance with His perfect love, though His hand may be heavy upon us, and the soul is ready to exclaim, “ The will of the Lord be done ;" let His name be glorified, whatever course things may take.

“He always wins who sides with God,

To him no chance is lost;
God's will is sweetest to him, when

It triumphs at his cost.”

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