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your Lord

and that he should then be driven away into sin or hardness of heart, she could never forgive herself.

34. “E. D.,” Lymington. 1 Corinthians xiv. 34 has no reference whatever to a woman's singing in the assembly. The apostle does not say, “ It is not permitted unto them to sing,” but “ to speak.” the passage to singing is simply absurd.

35. “R. C.," Plymouth. The marginal reading of Ephesians vi. 19, is rather more correct than the text. Our conflict is with the spiritual power of wickedness in the heavenlies. Israel's conflict was with flesh and blood in earthly places; ours is with spiritual powers in heavenly places. The expression “high places” has no such reference as you suggest.

36. “E. J.,” Ventnor. Would you like the Lord to. come and find you in a skating rink? Can

you

ask God's blessing on your going to such a place ? Can you go to the glory of God? Do you think would be found in such a place? The next time your “ fellow believer" asks you to go, just ask him or her the foregoing questions.

37. “R. W.,” Heckmondwike. We could not think of forming, much less of giving, a judgment in any case without having all the facts fully and clearly before us. Ignorance of a single fact might render the judg. ment not only worthless, but false, inasmuch as that one fact might so materially affect all the other facts as to alter their bearing completely and so reverse the judgment.

38. “E. B.,” Brighton. We beg to tender you our hearty thanks for your very kind and encouraging letter. Accept 1 Peter v. 10.

39. “B. L.,” Lower Norwood. Your narrative has come to hand. We can only say, " What hath God wrought !” His Name be praised !

40. «E. P. B.,” London. Scripture is totally silent on the point. We should never think of raising such a question.

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CONVERSION: WHAT IS IT?

PART VI.

The more we dwell on 1 Thessalonians i. 9, the more we are struck with its marvellous depth, fulness, and power. It seems like sinking a shaft into an inexhaustible mine. We have dwelt a little on that very fruitful and suggestive clause, “ Turned to God from idols.” How much is wrapped up in it! Do we really understand the force and fulness of it? It is a wonderful thing for the soul to be brought to God—to know Him now as our resource in all our weakness and need—the spring of all our joys—our strength and shield-our Guide and Counsellor-our all in all-to be absolutely and completely shut up to Him, wholly dependent upon Him.

Reader, do you know the deep blessedness of all this in your own soul ? If you are a child of God, a truly converted soul, then it is your happy privilege to know it, and you ought not to be satisfied without it. If we are “ turned to God,” what is it for, but to find in Him all we can possibly want for time and eternity ? Nothing can ever satisfy the human soul but God Him. self. It is not within the compass of earth to meet the cravings of the heart. If we had the wealth of the universe, and all that that wealth could procure, the heart would still want more; there would still be an aching void which nothing under the sun could fill.

Look at the history of Solomon. Hear him recording his own experience. “I, the preacher, was king over Israel in Jerusalem; and I gave my heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all things that are done under heaven; this sore travail hath God given to the sons of men to be exercised therewith. I havo seen all the works that are done under the sun, and, behold, all is vanity and vexation of spirit. That which is crooked cannot be made straight, and that which is wanting cannot be numbered. I communed with mine own heart, saying, Lo, I am come to great estate, and have gotten more wisdom than all they that have been before me in Jerusalem; yea, my heart had great experience of wisdom and knowledge. And I gave my heart to know wisdom,' and to know madness and folly. I perceived that this also is vexation of spirit. For in much wisdom is much grief, and ho that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow. I said in mine heart, Go to now, I will prove thee with mirth; therefore enjoy pleasure; and behold this also is vanity. I said of laughter, it is mad; and of mirth, what doeth it? I sought in mine heart to give myself to wine, yet acquainting mine heart with wisdom, and to lay hold on folly, till I might see what was that good for the sons of men, which they should do under the heaven all the days of their life. I made me great works: I builded me houses; I planted me vineyards; I made me gardens and orchards, and I planted trees in them of all kind of fruits; I made me pools of water, to water therewith the wood that bringeth forth trees. I got me servants and maidens, and had servants born in my house ; also I had great possessions of great and small cattle, above all that were in Jerusalem before

I gathered me also silver and gold, and the pecu. liar treasure of kings and of the provinces ; I gat me men singers and women singers,' and the delights of the sons of men, as musical instruments, and that of all sorts. So I was great, and increased more than all that were before me in Jerusalem; also my wisdom romained with me. And whatsoever mine eyes desired I kept not from them; I withheld not my heart from any joy; for my heart rejoiced in all my labour; and this was my portion of all my labour. Then I looked on all the works that my hands had wrought, and on the labour that I had laboured to do; and behold, all was vanity and vexation of spirit, and there was no profit under the sun.” Ecclesiastes i., ii.

me.

Such is the withering commentary upon all earth's resources, as given by the pen of one who had all that earth could give-of one who was allowed to drain to the very dregs every cup of human and earthly plea

And what was it all ? Vanity and vexation of spirit.” “ All things are full of labour; man cannot atter it; the eye is not satisfied with seeing, nor the ear filled with hearing.” The poor human heart can never be satisfied with the resources of earth. Creature streams can never quench the thirst of the immortal soul. Material things cannot possibly make us truly happy, even if they were permanent. 6 All is vanity and vexation of spirit.”

The truth of this must be proved by every human heart. Sooner or later all must find it out. Men may turn a deaf ear to it now; they may refuse to listen to the Spirit's warning voice; they may vainly imagine that this poor world can yield them substantial comfort and happiness; they may eagerly grasp at its riches, its honours, its distinctions, its pleasures, its material

sure.

comforts; but they will find out their mistake. And, oh, how dreadful to find it out too late! How terrible to open one's eyes in hell, like the rich man in the parable! What human language can set forth the horrors of a soul shut out for ever from the presence of God, and consigned to outer darkness, to the place of weeping, and wailing, and gnashing of teeth? It is absolutely overwhelming to think of it. What will it be to realise it? What will it be to find oneself in the tormenting flames of hell, at the other side of that impassable gulf, where a single ray of hope can never break through the deep and horrible gloom of eternity ?

Oh, that men would think of all this in time! that they might filee from the wrath to come, and lay hold on the blessed hope set before them in the gospel ; that they might "turn to God.” But alas ! the god of this world blinds their minds, lest the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God, should shine into them. He engrosses them with present things—business, money-making, pleasures, cares, lusts, anything and everything but the one thing, in comparison with which all earthly things are but as the small dust of the balance.

But we have digressed from our special theme, to which we must return.

We are particularly anxious to press upon the christian reader the immense importance of seeking to find all his resources in the living God. We have only, for a moment, turned aside from this point, in order to sound a warning note in the ear of any unconverted, careless one who may happen to take up this paper.

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