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knewest the free giving of God, thou wouldst have asked."

All this is blessedly true, thanks be to God for it! But, then, there is another side of the question. What did Paul mean by winning Christ?

He already possessed Christ as God's free gift to him as a sinner. What more did he want? He wanted to win Christ as his prize, even at the cost of all beside. As Christ, the true merchant man, sold all that He had, in order to possess Himself of what He esteemed “a pearl of great price”-laid aside His glory, stripped and emptied Himself of all-gave up all His claims as man, as Messiah, in order to possess Himself of the church; so, in his measure, that devoted Christian, whose words form our thesis, gave up everything in order to possess himself of that peerless object who had been revealed to his heart on the day of his conversion. He saw such beauty, such moral glory, such transcendent excellency in the Son of God, that he deliberately surrendered all the honours, the distinctions, the pleasures, the riches of earth, in order that Christ might fill every chamber of his heart, and absorb all the energies of his moral being. He longed to know Him not merely as the One who had put away his sins, but as the One who could satisfy all the longings of his soul, and utterly displace all that earth could offer or nature grasp.

Reader, let us gaze on this picture. It is indeed a fine study for us. It stands out in bold contrast with the cold, selfish, world-loving, pleasure-hunting, moneyseeking spirit of this our day. It administers a severe rebuke to the heartless indifference of which we must all alas ! be conscious—an indifference expressing itself in numberless and nameless ways. Where do we see aught that answers to the words, " That I тау

win Christ."

“THOU ART THE CHRIST, THE SON OF THE

LIVING GOD."

Matthew xyi. 26.

Thou art the Christ, Lord Jesus,

Son of the living God,
Worthy art Thou, most worthy,

To be by all adored.
Creator, Thou, of all things

In heaven and on earth,
All worlds are thine, Lord Jesus,

All owe to Thee their birth.
Humbled, rejected Saviour,

Nailed to the cursèd tree,
Bearing for guilty sinners,

Shame and indignity.
Oh! who can tell thy sorrows;

Or who conceive Thy pain ;
When Thou by God forsaken,

Wast crucified and slain ?

First-born of every creature,

Seated in glory now,
Head of the new creation,

Before Thy feet we bow.
Thou art the Christ, Lord Jesus,

Son of the living God,
We worship, we adore Thee,

The purchase of Thy blood.

M. S. S.

St. Petersburg, November 1877.

MARY AT THE SEPULCHRE.

JOHN XX.

In John xx. we have a scriptural illustration of affection for Christ; Mary Magdalene came early when it was yet dark to the sepulchre ; she did not wait for sunrise, but while nature was still shrouded in darkness, her affection hastens here to the only spot on earth that had any interest for herthe grave of her Lord. Oh! what a character this stamps upon the earth, it was the grave of Jesus ! Beloved reader, has it this character to you?

Now observe the Person of the blessed Lord was en. gaging the affections of the heart of Mary, and hence, how could she domicile where He was not ?

Not so Peter and John; having satisfied themselves that the sepulchre was empty, having carefully examined the empty grave, and seen the garments of death left behind by the mighty Conqueror who had risen out of them, they return to their own home.

But look at Mary, she has no home; and in more senses than one did this devoted woman standwithout;'' for not finding her Lord, she was truly without home, or cheer, or solace in her sorrow, a broken-hearted woman whom none can comfort; and yet it is a lovely sight, to see her in all her genuine personal love for Christ, standing, weeping, stooping down, and looking into His grave!

Ah! is this not rare- -the spirit of it I mean-in these days ? If I were asked what is the characteristic feature of the present time, what should I say? If I

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spoke the truth, I should say, HEARTLESSNESS AS TOUCHING CHRIST. Is it nothing to you, beloved reader, that Christ is rejected and cast out by man ? Oh! is it not very little thought of, and lightly esteemed? The absence of affection accounts for the little loyalty there is to the Lord Jesus. How few hearts are really true to Him! It is not possible to drill them into it; and mere knowledge cannot secure it. There is no lack of information as to Christ and His interests, yet it is a dry, cold thing, because it is not Christ. The question for the moment is, “ What think ye of Christ ?”

Another truth of exceeding beauty may be seen here, namely, How genuine affection gauges everythingmeasures everything. To Him who she thought was the gardener, she says, “Sir, if thou have borne him hence, tell me where thou hast laid him, and I will take him away.” Observe, she does not say who it is, but, Him;" gauging everyone's thoughts by her own; and as she was full of Him in her thoughts, supposing everyone else was like herself! Alas ! how little of this we find in ourselves or around us !

But observe too how her affection was the gauge of her ability. I will take him away." If she had reasoned or calculated, she might well have hesitated, ere she proposed such a task; but affection never calculates ; its power or ability is itself.

And now the moment has arrived for Jesus to make Himself known. What a moment for Him—for her! He fulfils John X., and “calleth his own sheep by name,” and she answers to John X., “The sheep hear his voice.” He gives her to hear her name from His own very lips -Mary!

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What a scene it is! The history of the first garden, its blight and sin, all reversed. The history of the first garden, with a fallen man and woman driven out by the hand of God, is closed at the cross of Jesus, and here in this second garden we find a risep Man and a redeemed woman, whose affection for His Person the blessed Lord appreciates at such worth, that He commissions her to be the bearer, to His disciples, of the most wonderful tidings that human lips ever announced. “Go to my brethren, and say unto them, i ascend unto my Father and your Father; and to my God and your God.

May the Lord awaken in the hearts of His people, in these days so sadly fruitful in debates, strifes, whisperings and confusion—but days of barrenness surely as to loyalty of affection for Christ—such true self-judgment as will lead to more whole-hearted devotedness, at all cost, to His person, honour, and interests!

W.T.T.

THE ROCK REFUGE.

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Trust ye in Jehovah for ever: for in Jah Jehovah is the Rock

of Ages.”—Is. xxvi. 4.

In perfect peace Thou wilt him keep,

Who in Thy place is dwelling;
The storm may rage, and waters deep

Around him may be swelling;
But fixed is he, Thy word is sure,
No storm can reach that place secure,

Nor foe touch that Pavilion.

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