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it is solemn and impressive. " And I saw a great white throne, and him that sat on it, from whose face the earth and the heaven fled away; and there was found no place for them. And I saw the dead, small and great, stand before the throne; and the books were opened ; and another book, which is the book of life; and the dead were judged out of those things which were written in books, according to their works. And the sea gave up the dead which were in it: and death and hades delivered up the dead which were in them; and they were judged every man according to their works. This is the second death-the lake of fire. And whosoever was not found written in the book of life was cast into the lake of fire." Revelation xx.

All this is as plain as words can make it. There is not the slightest ground for demur or difficulty. For all whose names are in the book of life, there is no judgment at all. Those whose names are not in that book shall be judged according to their works. And what then ? Annihilation ? Nay; but," the lake of fire ;" and that for ever and for ever.

How overwhelming is the thought of this ! Surely it ought to rouse every soul to the serious consideration of the great subject now before us, namely, the urgent need of conversion to God. This is the only way of escape. An unconverted person, whoever and whatever he is, has death, judgment, and the lake of fire before him, and every throb of his pulse brings him nearer and nearer to those awful realities. It is not more sure that the sun shall rise, at a certain moment, tomorrow morning, than that the reader must, ere long, pass into eternity; and if his name is not in the book of

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life-if he is not converted—if he is not in Christ, he will, assuredly, be judged according to his works, and the certain issue of that judgment will be the lake that burneth with fire and brimstone, and that through the endless ages of a dark and gloomy eternity. Oh! the terrible monotony of hell !

The reader may perhaps marvel at our dwelling at such length on this dreadful theme. He may feel disposed to ask, “ Will this convert people ?” If it does not convert them, it may lead them to see their need of conversion. It may lead them to see their imminent danger. It may induce them to flee from the wrath to

Why did the blessed apostle reason with Felix on the subject of “judgment to come ?” Surely that he might persuade him to turn from his evil ways and live. Why did our blessed Lord Himself so constantly press upon His hearers the solemn reality of eternity ? Why did He so often speak of the deathless worm and the unquenchable fire ? Surely it was for the purpose

of rousing them to a sense of their danger, that they might flee for refuge to lay hold upon the hope set before them.

Are we wiser than He? Are we more tender ? Have we found out some better mode of converting people ? Are we to be afraid of pressing upon our readers or our hearers, the same solemn theme which our Lord so pressed upon the men of His time? Are we to shrink from offending polite ears by the plain declaration that all who die unconverted must inevitably stand before the great white throne, and pass into the lake of fire ? God forbid! It must not be. We solemnly call upon the unconverted reader in this our

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opening paper for the year 1878, to give his undivided attention to the all important question of his soul's salvation. Let nothing induce him to neglect it. Let neither cares, pleasures, nor duties so occupy him as to hide from his view the magnitude and deep seriousness of this matter. “What shall it profit a man if he shall gain the whole world and lose his own soul? Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul ?”

Oh! reader, if thou art unsaved, unconverted, let us earnestly entreat thee to ponder these things. If God permit, we hope, in a future paper, to unfold what conversion is how it is effected, and what it involves. But, just now, it seems pressed upon us in the form of a solemn duty to seek to rouse thee to a sense of thy need of being savingly converted to God. This is the only way of entering His kingdom. So our Lord Christ distinctly tells us; and we trust you know this, at least, that not one jot or tittle of His holy sayings can ever pass away. Heaven and earth shall pass away; but His word can never pass away. All the power of earth and hell, men and devils, cannot make void the words of our Lord Jesus Christ. Either of two things for thee-conversion here, or eternal damnation hereafter.

Thus it stands if we are to be guided by the word of God; and, in view of this, is it possible for us to be too earnest, too vehement, too importunate in urging upon every unconverted soul with whom we may come in contact, either with voice or pen, the indispensable necessity, this very moment, of fleeing from the wrath to come, fleeing to that blessed Saviour who died on the

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cross for our salvation ; who stands with open arms to receive all who come; and who declares in His own sweet and precious grace, “HIM THAT COMETH UNTO ME, I WILL IN NO WISE CAST OUT."

(To be continued, if the Lord will.)

REFLECTIONS ON THE EPISTLE

OF JUDE.

We now come to consider one of the principal means by which the saint is maintained in the conscious enjoyment of the divine favour.

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upon it.

No christian duty, or rather, no distinctive christian privilege, is more nourishing, more strengthening to the heart, than this holy building. It evidently implies progress in the knowledge of the truth and that by the believer's diligent study of the word. We are not called to rest merely on the true foundation but to build

“ Tho faith once delivered to the saints," finds a place not only in the sacred writings, but in the heart of the growing Christian. The word “faith" here means, not the Christian's act of faith, but the truths which he believes—it is the object, not the act of faith. This also is the way, the sure way, of keeping ourselves in the love of God, in communion with Him.

But why is it called not only “faith,” but “our most holy faith ?” Because they are the words of the

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thrice Holy One who reveals them, and the heart is purified by faith. When we are built up by this faith we must be made holy. 66 As he which hath called you is holy, so be ye holy in all manner of conversation ; because it is written, Be ye holy; for I am holy." (1 Pet. i. 15, 16.) It is also holy faith, inasmuch as it separates the believer from the overspreading evil which may be more or less developed in his day. “ Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world : looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour, Jesus Christ, who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.” Titus ii. 12, 13, 14.

The apostle Peter in the commencement of his second Epistle introduces a line of truth, which, while exceedingly valuable in itself, forms the best commentary we can have on the exhortations of the apostle Jude. “According as his divine power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godiiness, through the knowledge of him that hath called us to glory and virtue; whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises : that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust.” Here the Christian is said to be 66 called," as in our kindred Epistle, but not to keep himself in the love of God, or to build himself up on his most holy faith ; but to that which will accomplish precisely the same objects. He is called to glory and virtue;" glory as an object,

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