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Suppose, for instance, that the third letter dealt out is a "w" may claim the word "no." and adding his "w" to it, make it "now." The fourth letter turned up may be a "y," and the owner of "now" breathes a sigh of relief as he thinks he will hold on to his word for a little while any way, for the "now" and the "y" don't seem to make anything.

Perhaps several letters follow out of which no combination can be made that will spell a correct word, until some one gets an “s." This letter, in connection with "now" will spell"snow," but, if the lucky owner of the "s" is sharp enough, he will also claim the "y" from his other rival and spell "snowy."

The examples given here are sample words, as they show more clearly to young minds how the game may be played easily; but when a number of letters have been dealt out the most skillful spellers may hnd scope for their abilities, and many are the combinations which will escape the notice of all who are gathered around the table for a time, until some one discovers them as if by accident, and then the wonder will be that they were not seen before.

One player may not claim from another any letter or letters which have been worked up into a word without taking that whole word and using it all, though its letters may be entirely transposed to make a different word.

The range of words may wander over half a dozen different languages if the players so agree, and then the game becomes difficult enough for a college professor.

The winner of the game is the player who has the most complete words spread out on the table in front of him when the dealer has turned up the last letter he has on his pile. Long words count no more than short words, and if two players "tie," they set to work breaking up their long words into short ones, and this disposes of the 'tie" nine times out of ten.

For a large number of players a large number of letters is of course required; but two people will often play the game for half an hour before exhausting a half-dozen complete alphabets.-Golden Days.

Hon. Roswell P. Flower, who recently was nominated for governor of New York, began his life as a school teacher.

universally. Appeal to these, awaken them, use them and make men moral beings.

We call it quackery when a man deals with human lives by haphazzard processes and reckless experimenting, and it deserves no better name when human souls are treated in the same fashion.

The right attitude in regard to schools is a readiness to make whatever changes experience, the readjustment of other schools and the public needs may render necessary,

America has a large, loose system of schools, excellent according to the excellency of all its parts, and depressed by all their defects, confusions, weaknesses and failures.

The schools must do something more than simply drill the minds

WORLD'S FAIR NOTES.

Pennsylvania,s exposition building will cost $75,000.

They

The Western Union Telegraph Company intends to frame handsomely the first telegraph message ever sent, which was in May, 1844, and exhibit it in the Electrical Department.at the Exposition.

The message was reccived by Prof. Morse at the Capitol at Washington, from an assistant in Annapolis.

The American Pomological Society, at its recent annual meeting in Washington, decided to make an exhibit classified by state and county associations, and also by individuals; and it appointed a world's Fair committee of six to confer with she Horticultural Department, and to perfect arrangements.

The Florida Horticultural Society has asked for three acres in which to show an orange grove and make a fruit display.

The general passenger agents of twenty of the railroads entering Chicago have organized a special association for the determination of excursion rates to the Exposition and for arranging facilities for caring for the enormous crowds of visitors to the World's Fair.

The savants and historians of Italy are now deeply interesting themselves in the question of Columbus'real birthplace. Five or six places besides Genoa claim the honor, and among them is Bettola. It is reported that proofs have lately been discovered establishing Bettola's claim, and that the town will erect a monument to Columbus

Suppose, for instance, that the third letter dealt out is a "w" may claim the word "no." and adding his "w" to it, make it "now." The fourth letter turned up may be a "y," and the owner of "now" breathes a sigh of relief as he thinks he will hold on to his word for a little while any way, for the "now" and the "y" don't seem to make anything.

Perhaps several letters follow out of which no combination can be made that will spell a correct word, until some one gets an "s." This letter, in connection with "now" will spell"snow," but, if the lucky owner of the "s" is sharp enough, he will also claim the "y" from his other rival and spell "snowy."

The examples given here are sample words, as they show more

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The cultured mind and the pure heart constitute the American title to nobility.

The study of English should take the place of much of the work devoted to the text book readers.

The graduate of a city training school should stand solely on her merits in competing for a position in her own city.

If properly placed before him, the dullest boy will find satisfaction in pouring over the pages of even a book of statistics.

Discipline is a cultivation of honor among the pupils rather than the infliction of punishment for misdeeds.

The only legitimate use of rank cards is to give the parent the teacher's estimate of the child's work and conduct in school.

A marked taste and ability for mathematics and an aversion to language studies is an indictation that the latter should be entirely neglected.

To stand still is to retrograde, and know what is the best for the school and not to act, is failure.

What the schools need to-day is not more work, but greater thoroughness in what is attempted.

With the outline of the work well in mind the pupil teacher develops strength more rapidly if she invents her own way of doing it. Moral principles are few, simple, clear, and are perceived by men

universally. Appeal to these, awaken them, use them and make men moral beings.

We call it quackery when a man deals with human lives by haphazzard processes and reckless experimenting, and it deserves no better name when human souls are treated in the same fashion.

The right attitude in regard to schools is a readiness to make whatever changes experience, the readjustment of other schools and the public needs may render necessary,

America has a large, loose system of schools, excellent according to the excellency of all its parts, and depressed by all their defects, confusions, weaknesses and failures.

The schools must do something more than simply drill the minds of the pupils and ciam them with unnecessary information. They must make men and women helpful to themselves and each other in the concerns and problems of every-day life, or their full possibilities and helpfulness will not be realized.

ALEXANDER AND DIOGENES.

There once lived in Corinth a strange wise man whose name was Diogenes. The king Alexander one day visited Diogenes, and sought to get acquainted with him. Now, above all things, Diogenes loved simplicity. He wore an old, torn mantle, went barefoot, and carried a beggars sack upon his back. For a dwelling place he used a tub. He had thrown away his drinking cup, for he had once seen a boy drink from the hollow of his hand.

When Alexander came to visit him, Diogenes lay before his tub, that the sun might shine upon him. He scarcely lifted his eyes to notice the king. Alexander talked long with the strange man, and found his answers wise and pointed. At last the king offered to grant any favor Diogenes might desire. The wise man thanked him for his offer, and said, "Get out of my sunshine." The companions of the king laughed at this foolish wish, but Alexander reproved their laughter and said, "Truly, were I not Alexander, I would be Diogenes."

Find the nouns and pronouns in the story that are used as direct objects. Do you find expressions containing more than one word that seem to be objects?

28

TO PATRONS.

To obtain the best results, a teacher must have the hearty cooperation of his patrons. If the teacher pleases you, let him and the children know it, it will encourage them. If the teacher does not please you, it is to your interest to keep it a secret from the children. so long as you patronize the school. If you critieise him before them, they will take advantage of it, believing that you will uphold them in what they do, and trouble will come sooner or later. If something does not suit you, go to the teacher about it: you will always find him in a good humor, and glad to talk with you about anything teat pertains to the best interest of your children or the school.

Start your children the first day and send regularly, if you wish to get the full benefit of the school. your child becomes very anxious to stop school, be very cautious about yielding to his wishes. it may be that the teacher has convinced that he must study. We will make the school-room as pleasant as possible, but we cannot afford to sacrifice business for pleasure. Such rules and regulations will be adopted as will be best for the school and for the moral, intellectual, and physical improvement of the pupils. You cannot get the benefit of a grind stone unless you hold the ax to it.

Mr. Editor:

EXERCISE IN GEOGRAPHY.

As

If you will allow me space, I will give you a sketch of experimental work made with my geography classes, together results of same. is now recognized among leading educators, there is no exercise which can so easily of quickly impress the child's mind with a thorough knowledge of a country's shape, size, surroundings, natural and political divisions, as the exercise in map-drawing. The reasons for this, which are many, I shall now not discuss. My work is this: Give your class a country, the map of which is to be drawn to a given scale. Let each member of your class present at recitation houra completed map. Examine maps with class, making and having them for you, measurements and calculations, pointing out defects, and giving any suggestions which you may think necessary. When maps

are complete, then direct your pupils to transfer them to wood. This can be easily and accurately done as follows: Let pupils get their

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