Inventing the Sacred: Imposture, Inquisition, And the Boundaries of the Supernatural in Golden Age Spain

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BRILL, 2005 - History - 229 pages
This volume examines the Spanish Inquisition's response to a host of self-proclaimed holy persons and miracle-working visionaries whose spiritual exploits garnered popular acclaim in seventeenth-century Spain. In an effort to control this groundswell of religious enthusiasm, the Spanish Inquisition began prosecuting the crime of feigned sanctity, attempting to distinguish "false saints" from their officially approved counterparts. Drawing on Inquisition trial records, confessors' manuals, treatises on the discernment of spirits, and spiritual autobiographies, the book situates the problem of religious imposture in relation to the Catholic church's campaigns of social discipline and confessionalization in the post-Tridentine era and analyzes the ways in which conceptual controversies in early modern demonology, medicine, and natural philosophy complicated the church's disciplinary aims.

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Contents

Chapter One The Case of Mateo the Holy MatMaker
13
New Babylon or Catholic Court
35
ChapterThree VisionsofUncertainty
55
Chapter Four Interiority Discipline and Unconfined Women
87
ChapterFive SpiritualPlagiarism
114
ChapterSix TheMiraculousBodyofEvidence
139
ChapterSeven MedicinalMonarchy
183
Conclusion
202
Index
225
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Andrew Keitt, Ph.D. (1998) in History, University of California, Berkeley, is Associate Professor of History at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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