An Abridgement of Universal Geography, Modern and Ancient

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W.D. Ticknor, 1835 - Atlases - 520 pages
 

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Page 19 - ... from the northwest angle of Nova Scotia, viz., that angle which is formed by a line drawn due north from the source of St. Croix River to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence, from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean...
Page 19 - St. Croix River to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence, from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean, to the northwesternmost head of Connecticut River...
Page 128 - It shall be the duty of the General Assembly, as soon as circumstances will permit, to provide by law for a general system of education, ascending in a regular gradation from township schools to a State University, wherein tuition shall be gratis, and equally open to all.
Page 176 - ... change of seasons; as in a few minutes he can pass from summer to winter, from the lower to the higher regions of the atmosphere, the abode of eternal cold; and thence descend at will to the torrid or the arctic regions of the earth.
Page 130 - Assembly, and consists of a senate and house of representatives. The senators are nine in number, namely, three from each county, and are elected for a term of four years. The representatives are elected for a term of two years, and are twenty-one in number, seven from each county.
Page 84 - Henry, Highland. Isle of Wight. James City. King and Queen, King George, King William. Lancaster, Lee, Loudoun, Louisa, Lunenburg.
Page 143 - ... it descends from that direction ; yet in its passage southward, it is in some places called Rio Grande, on account of its extent ; but the name of Rio Bravo (Bold or Rapid river), so often given to it on maps, is seldom if ever heard among the people. Though its entire length, following its meanders from its source in the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of Mexico, must be considerably over two thousand miles, it is hardly navigable to the extent of two hundred miles above its mouth. The head branch...
Page 176 - ... but man, and, from the ethereal heights to which he soars, looking abroad at one glance, on an immeasurable expanse of forests, fields, lakes and ocean, deep below him; he appears indifferent to the...
Page 273 - This celebrated volcano has thrown out flames, at intervals, for more than 2000 years. Its immense size and solitary elevation, the beauty and magnificence of the surrounding scenery, and the terrific grandeur of the convulsions to which it has been subject, have made it one of the wonders of the world. At a distance, it appears like a truncated cone. Upon a nearer approach, the traveller is astonished at the wild and grotesque appearance of the whole mountain.
Page 176 - He has been long known to naturalists, being common to both continents, and occasionally met with from a very high northern latitude, to the borders of the torrid zone, but chiefly in the vicinity of the sea, and along the shores and cliff-s of our lakes and large rivers. Formed by nature for braving the severest cold; feeding equally on the produce of the sea, and of the land; possessing powers of flight capable of outstripping even the tempests themselves; unawed by...

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