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Page. In reference to Preaching, the great practical question considered, Who ought to be the preachers ?

304 General reasons adduced, to prove that they ought to be natives, 308 The inadequate supply of existing missionary stations,

310 Prodigious disproportion between the number of labourers and the extent of the field,

311 Occasional itineracy a very inefficient means of evangelization, 313 Different causes of this pointed out,

314 Superiority of the localizing system,

315 Other arguments, besides the numerical one, in favour of an extensive native agency,

319 The diminution of expense,

326 The necessity of the mode of life being such as to bring a holy example fully to bear upon the people,

326 The necessity of a familiar acquaintance with the tones and idiom of

speech ; the manners, habits, and prevalent modes of thinking, 327 Natives, the real reformers of their own country,

329 How qualified natives are to be raised, .

331 Objections to Educational Institutions in connection with the missionary enterprise fully considered,

338 That missionaries are thereby converted into Professors instead of Preachers,

338 That the scheme is different from that which was blessed with a Pentecostal effusion,

343 That it is contrary to Apostolic example,

353 Translation and Circulation of the Bible,

375 Question considered as to the amount of good to be expected from

the written word in the absence of the living voice to direct at-
tention towards it, .

376 To raise up a native agency ought to be not a secondary, but a primary object, in conducting the missionary enterprise,

392 Happy day for India, when through the instrumentality of the edu

cational and other means employed, qualified natives shall be-
come the Christian teachers, preachers, and translators to their
countrymen ! . .

398 Corroborations from the work of the Rev. Howard Malcom, just published..

399

CHAPTER V.

MISCELLANEOUS OBJECTIONS TO THE MISSIONARY ENTERPRISE

CONSIDERED.

Page. The objection of the careless scoffer, who summarily denounces the

whole as novel and visionary, the growth of modern fanaticism, 405 CHAPTER VI.

Page.

The objection of the worldly politician, who, with a special reference

to India, dreads the propagation of Christianity as dangerous to the stability of the Anglo-Indian empire, .

416 The objection of unreflectiny economists, who allege that, as so many

return with immense fortunes from India, we should restrict our pecuniary demands to the people of that wealthy region,

433 The objections of the latitudinarian liberalist,

436
That it is an insult to obtrude our religion on the upholders
of another faith,

437
That to teach our religion to their children is an invasion of
the natural rights of parents, .

437
And that it is cruel to disturb the peace of families by at-
tempts to secure their conversion,

440 The objection of the luxuriously wealthy, who evade every petition by replying that they have little or nothing to spare,

443 The objection of the humble poor, who are fearful lest their mite should be too insignificant to prove of any avail,

449 The objection of the speculative theorist, who waives all active sup

port on the ground of hypothetical reasonings and anticipations, 451 The objection of the merely nominal, or sincere but weak-minded Christian

that there is enough of heathenism at home, without troubling ourselves with foreign lands,

459 Concluding appeal.

470

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AN ACCOUNT OF THE RISE AND EARLY PROGRESS OF THE CHURCH OF

SCOTLAND'S INDIA MISSION.

Page. The Church of Christ ceases to flourish when it ceases to be missionary,

474 Towards the close of last century, the Protestant Churches began to awaken from their long slumber,

475 The Church of Scotland, which for years had maintained the attitude

of spectator, at length resolves, in 1824, in its national corporate
capacity, to embark on a missionary enterprise,

476 Committee appointed by the General Assembly to conduct it, 478 Rudimental conception of an education and preaching mission to

India as originally announced and approved of by the General
Assembly,

479 Dr Inglis the undisputed author of it,

481 Evidence of this assertion,

482 Notices of preparatory measures during the years 1825, 6, 7, 8, 485

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Page. In 1829 the first Missionary nominated,

489 His disastrous voyage to India, and reception there,

492 Dr Bryce's disinterested services, .

496 Difficulties in ascertaining the existing state of things, with a view to missionary operation,

497 Reasons for preferring Calcutta to a rural station,

501 The primary design to establish a central Institution for higher education,

506 Reasons for abandoning this design at the outset,

507 Resolutions to institute preparatory schools,

508 Elementary schools in the Bengali or vernacular dialect totally inefficient for the purposes of a higher Institution,

512 Choice to be made between Sanskrit and English as the medium of superior instruction,

517 English pronounced the grand instrument for conveying the entire

range of European knowledge,--literary, scientific, and theolo-
gical,—to the select few who, in various ways, are to influence
the minds of their countrymen,

518 Account of the opening of the first English mission-seminary at Cal

cutta, with a specific view to an enlarged European Education, 525 Various incidents connected therewith,.

526 Introduction of the intellectual or mental developement system of tuition, .

532 The Bible an essential part of the scheme of instruction,

534 Notices of the early impression produced by its perusal,

540 Illustration of the effect of general knowledge in demolishing the sacred authority of the Shastras,

556 Various reflections arising out of this subject,

559 Vicissitudes of the first twelvemonth,

574 First public examination of the Institution,

580 The happy effect of that examination on the European and native community,

584 Some of the present and anticipated results of the Educational part of the system pointed out,

585 Its general bearing on the evangelization of India,

600

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APPENDIX.

Brief sketch of the circumstances which led to the delivery of the first

series of Lectures on the Evidences and Doctrines of Natural
and Revealed Religion ever addressed to an Audience of edu-
cated Hindus in Eastern India,—with notices of some of the
results, as more especially manifested in the ultimate conversion
of a few to the faith of Jesus. .

607

CHAPTER I.

THE PARAMOUNT INFLUENCE WHICH INDIA HAS SUCCESSIVELY EX

ERTED ON THE PROSPERITY OF THE LEADING CITIES AND NATIONS
OF THE WEST THEREMARKABLE SERIES OF PROVIDENTIAL
EVENTS BY WHICH INDIA HAS BEEN OPENED UP AS THE LARGEST
AND MOST PROMISING FIELD FOR CHRISTIAN MISSIONS NOW IN THE
WORLD—AND THE CONSEQUENT OBLIGATION THAT DEVOLVES ON
BRITISH CHRISTIANS IN PARTICULAR, TO AVAIL THEMSELVES OF
THE PRECIOUS OPPORTUNITY FOR SPREADING THE KNOWLEDGE OF
THE GOSPEL AMONG THE MILLIONS OF FELLOW-SUBJECTS IN THAT
BENIGHTED LAND.

Announcement of the grand historic fact or law of the paramount influence of India on the Western Nations-Proofs and illustrations of this fact— The Peninsula of ArabiaPalmyraTyre-Alexandria-Bagdad— GhizniThe Crusades open up Eastern Asia to Western Europe-Venice-Attempts to discover a new passage to India-Henry of Portugal-Columbus, Vasco de Gama doubles the CapeEffect of this discovery-LisbonAmsterdam-Splendid series of English voyages, with the view of reaching India- The final supremacy of BritainThree distinct eras or epochs of peculiar interest in behalf of IndiaThe era of romantic imaginative interest - The era of romantic literary interest - The era of vivid religious interest-Designs of Providence in subjecting India to Britain-Glance at the remarkable series of events which have thrown all India open as a field for Missionary enterprise-Analogy between the condition of the Roman empire at the commencement of the Christian era, and the present position of India-Argument and appeal founded on this, in behalf of the spread of the Gospel.

For the last three thousand years has India, un«xhausted and inexhaustible, been pouring an uninterrupted stream of opulence upon the Western World.

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