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earnings, more than sixty thousand pounds !—Talk of flaws and imperfections in the multitudinous sayings and doings of such men !-would it not be miraculous if none such could be detected ? Owing to man's fallibility, errors in judgment may lead to the projection of inadequate measures ; owing to man's frailty, there may often be feebleness in the execution of good ones. But, in all Christendom, let any three men be pointed out, who have done more than Ward, Marshman, and Carey, to earn new trophies for the Redeemer in the hitherto unconquered realms of Paganism,and then, but not till then, would the Author consent to remain silent when the first stone was thrown at the noble, the immortal, triumvirate of Serampore !

In conclusion, the Author cannot but publicly return his unfeigned thanks to his kind and revered friend, the Rev. Dr Brunton,-under whose hospitable roof he has during the last four months found a congenial home, - and for all whose counsels and valuable suggestions, when the present Work was passing through the press, he has been laid under obligations which can never be adequately repaid.

Now, to Him, “who is the blessed, and only Potentate, the King of kings, and Lord of lords ; who only hath immortality, dwelling in the light which no man can approach unto ; whom no man hath seen, nor can see ;-to Him be honour and power everlasting. Amen."

BILSTANE NEAR EDINBURGH,

25th October 1839.

** Should any profits arise from the sale of this Publication, they are to be devoted exclusively to purposes promotive of the interests of the India Mission.

Page.

.

The necessity of knowing the real condition of a people, in order to

the adoption of effectual measures for their amelioration,

38

This illustrated in the case of India,

39

Religion the master-principle in moulding the character, opinions,

and practices of the people,

40

Their religion contained in writings believed to be divine,

42

These writings locked up in the Sanskrit language,

44

Enumeration of them,

45

Attempt to unfold the orthodox theory of the Brahmanical faith, 49

Foundation of the system in the belief of one great universal Spirit, 50

Description of the nature and character of this Spirit,

51

Shown to be an infinite nothing, yet substantially all things,

52

Reflections on the fact that he is without any moral attributes, 57

The manifestation of the universe, at a time when nought existed but

the Supreme Spirit,

64

The whole is a pantheism,

65

Four distinct views of this subject entertained in the orthodox schools, 66

Spiritual Pantheism,

67

Psycho-ideal Pantheism,

69

Psycho-material Pantheism,

75

Reflections on this confounding of the creature with the Creator, 82

Psycho-material-mythologic Pantheism,

86

The geographical and astronomical construction of the universe,

educed from the substance of the Supreme Spirit,

88

The peopling of all worlds with animated beings,

95

The immense epochs of the duration of the universe, with its succes-

sive destructions and renovations,

101

Glance at the mode in which the grand theory of Hinduism is re-

duced to practice,

120

Various exemplifications,

121

Transmigration of souls a vital and operative doctrine,

123

A graduated scale of rewards and punishments,

125

The wicked sent to one or other of innumerable hells,

125

They reappear on earth in mineral, vegetable, or brutal forms, 125

Obedience and acts of merit recompensed by admission into one or

other of the heavens of the gods — The highest reward is absorp-

tion or refusion into the Divine Essence,

128

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Page. The Goddess Kali, her sanguinary character and worship,

240 The Patroness of thieves and murderers,

242 The Charak Pujah, or swinging festival,

244 Various self-inflicted tortures described,

245 Account of the great day of the festival, when multitudes resort to

the celebrated temple of Kali-ghat, in the neighbourhood of Cal-
cutta,

250 Sketch of the appearance of the groups of devotees, of the temple and monster-block of the idol,

251 Cruel practices of the worshippers,

254 Their frantic revelries contrasted with the solemnities of a Christian Sabbath in Great Britain,

256 Call upon Christians to come forth to “ the help of the Lord against

the mighty.”

258

CHAPTER IV.

THE GOSPEL TIE ONLY EFFECTUAL INSTRUMENT IN REGENERATING

INDIA-GENERAL CONSIDERATION OF THE VARIOUS AGENCIES TO BE EMPLOYED IN ITS PROPAGATION, AND OF SPECIAL OBJECTIONS.

Page. Various expedients proposed for remedying the evils under which India has, for ages, groaned,

260 The Scheme of Political Reform,

261 The Scheme of Economic Reform,

262 The Scheme of Secular Education Reform,

264 The Scheme of Temporizing Religious Reform,

270 All these nugatory,

271 The Gospel, the only effectual instrument of genuine Reformation, 272 Illustration of this,

272 The practical question proposed, How, or by what means is the Gospel to be most successfully propagated ?

281 Quotation from the Author of the Natural History of Enthusiasm, 281 The three generic measures,

285 1. Christian Education of the Young. 2. Preaching to the Adults.

3. The circulation of the Bible. These not antagonists, but mutual friends and allies,

285 In reference to Education, the practical question considered, Whe

ther is it better at the outset, to pursue the direct method of attempting at once to impart a general elementary knowledge to the many, or the indirect method of attempting to reach the many through the instrumentality of the instructed few ?

290

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