Scars of War: The Impact of Warfare on Modern China

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Diana Lary, Stephen MacKinnon
UBC Press, Nov 1, 2011 - History - 222 pages
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Throughout its modern history China has suffered from immense destruction and loss of life from warfare. In its worst periods of warfare, the eight years of the Anti-Japanese War (1937-45), millions of civilians lost their lives. For China, the story of modern war-related death and suffering has remained hidden. The Rape of Nanking is beginning to be known, but hundreds of other massacres are still unrecognized by the outside world and even by China itself. The focus of The Scars of War is the social and psychological, not the economic, costs of war on the country. The book is illustrated with contemporary photographs and woodblock prints. Each chapter is introduced by a traditional Chinese saying (cheng-yu) on warfare.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Military Atrocities Warlordism and AntiWarlordism in Republican China
18
2 The Pacification of Jiading
50
Searching for Explanations
76
The Devastation of the Xuzhou Region 1938
98
5 Refugee Flight at the Outset of the AntiJapanese War
118
A Comparative Analysis of the FiftiethAnniversary Commemoration in Mainland China and Taiwan of the Victory in the AntiJapanese War
136
The Political and Social Predicament of CCP War Widows and Veterans 194966
162
Glossary
189
Bibliography
193
Contributors
203
Index
204
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About the author (2011)

Diana Lary is a professor of history, affiliated with the Center for Chinese Research, at the University of British Columbia. Stephen MacKinnon is a professor of history at Arizona State University.

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