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the water would not remain in the basket. Then the father said, "Give me the basket, and let me look at it." And when he took the basket in his hand, and had examined it, he said, "Now, see, my son, you have not worked in vain: true it is, indeed, that no water has remained in the basket, but it has washed it clean and pure. So it is, too, with you, and every one who hears and reads God's Word with diligence and prayer; he may not retain everything, but still it purifies his mind, and makes him more fit for heaven."

THE ANCIENT BRITONS.

I.

HE origin of the people

who lived in the British Islands two thousand years ago is not clearly known. We are not sure from which of the grandsons of Noah they were descended, but it was probably from one of the sons of Japheth. Some historians tell us that Britain was first inhabited by one or other of the Cimmerian or Celtic tribes, who were the earliest settlers in the western parts of Europe. The Cimmerians, it is said, were

driven frem their ancient home, north of the Black Sea, by the Scythians; and, having crossed Europe in a north-west direction, found a new home near the Baltic and the mouth of the river Elbe. These barbarians afterwards reached Britain, crossing over from the neighbouring country of Gaul. The Welsh are undoubtedly descended from the ancient inhabitants of Britain, and they still call themselves Cymri. The name of one of our counties, Cumberland, is also probably derived from the same source.

Why our country came to be called Britain is also uncertain. Its name has been by some derived from a Celtic word brith, or brit, meaning "painted; in which, it is thought, there is a reference to the custom of the inhabitants of staining their bodies with a blue colour obtained from woad, a plant used by dyers. Others maintain that the name in the most ancient British poets was Inis (or island) prydhain, but what the latter term means no one seems to know. Britannia is the word used by the Latin writers in describing our country and its inhabitants.

The Celtic tribes were generally employed as shepherds of

the NAME which, to all who know how to look for it, will appear written in different ways all over the glorious building. As in the story I have told you, it is the name of Him who planned and raised it—the name of our Lord and Saviour JESUS CHRIST.-Dr. Green's "Lectures on the Bible."

"Did you never forget Him?" "O yes! often."

"And yet He loves you far more than you love your brother. How your forgetfulness must grieve Him!"

Before the throne of glory, Christ remembers us from day to day. Shall we then forget Him who ever intercedes for us?

THE FORGOTTEN ONE.

UT to think that my brother could forget me," cried Charlotte, large tears coursing down her cheeks," when I have loved him so, and longed for our meeting again!"

"It is because you are changed 80 much that he does not remember you; you were very little when you parted," replied her "You will always be together now, and know and love each other as before."

mamma.

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THE STUDENT AND THE OLD FATHER.

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STUDENT once went for advice to a pious old man, and said to him, 'Father, I love much to hear about God and spiritual things, but all the good I hear seems to go in at one ear and out at the other; I forget it so soon, and this grieves me."

Then the old father said, "My son, take this basket, and bring it to me full of water."

The student obeyed; he took the basket, and went to a brook, and worked hard for a long time, but he could get no water to stay in the basket; as soon as it was full it became empty again. Then at last he got tired, for he saw that all his labour was in vain; so he went back to the father, and told him what had happened, and how

"I think not, mamma." "Who is your best Friendthe ever-blessed, loving Friend who died for you?"

"Jesus Christ, the Saviour."

the water would not remain in the basket. Then the father said, "Give me the basket, and let me look at it." And when he took the basket in his hand, and had examined it, he said, "Now, see, my son, you have not worked in vain: true it is, indeed, that no water has remained in the basket, but it has washed it clean and pure. So it is, too, with you, and every one who hears and reads God's Word with diligence and prayer; he may not retain everything, but still it purifies his mind, and makes him more fit for heaven."

THE ANCIENT BRITONS.

I.

HE origin of the people who lived in the British Islands two thousand years ago is not clearly known. We are not sure from which of the grandsons of Noah they were descended, but it was probably from one of the sons of Japheth. Some historians tell us that Britain was first inhabited by one or other of the Cimmerian or Celtic tribes, who were the earliest settlers in the western parts of Europe. The Cimmerians, it is said, were

driven frem their ancient home, north of the Black Sea, by the Scythians; and, having crossed Europe in a north-west direction, found a new home near the Baltic and the mouth of the river Elbe. These barbarians afterwards reached Britain, crossing over from the neighbouring country of Gaul. Welsh are undoubtedly descended from the ancient inhabitants of Britain, and they still call themselves Cymri. The name of one of our counties, Cumberland, is also probably derived from the same source.

The

Why our country came to be called Britain is also uncertain. Its name has been by some derived from a Celtic word brith, or brit, meaning "painted;" in which, it is thought, there is a reference to the custom of the inhabitants of staining their bodies with a blue colour obtained from woad, a plant used by dyers. Others maintain that the name in the most ancient British poets was Inis (or island) prydhain, but what the latter term means no one seems to know. Britannia is the word used by the Latin writers in describing our country and its inhabitants.

The Celtic tribes were generally employed as shepherds of

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civilized than the rest. The Phoenicians were for a long time very careful not to make known the situation of the country from which tin was obtained by them. They are supposed to have kept the secret wholly to themselves for three hundred years; and an ancient historian called Strabo says that, in one instance, the master of a Phoenician vessel ran his ship on shore, and destroyed it, when he found that some Roman vessels were resolved on following his course, so as to find out where tin came from. To us it may appear very strange that the people of Italy did not know of such an island as Britain; but in those days the pilots of ships never willingly went out of sight of land, and the situation of countries was little known, except to those who lived in them.

The first accounts of Britain that give us any certain information, relate to a period about a hundred years before Christ. At that time its inhabitants were few compared with the present population; and were wild, fierce, and uncivilized. A large part of the country was covered with woods. One forest, in the southern part of England, called Anderida, was above a hundred miles in length; and

in the midland counties there were forests equally large. Other parts of Britain were covered with marshes, which were frequently overflowed by the rivers, whose bed was blocked by various obstacles; or with lakes, the waters of which had no outlet. Such is the state of almost every country before it is regularly settled and inhabited.

The greater part of the ancient Britons wore their hair long; they had scarcely any clothing, except a few garments made from the hides of beasts; and their bodies were marked with many strange figures and devices, like the present natives of some of the South Sea Islands. These figures were made by pricking the skin with an instrument having many sharp points, and then rubbing the places so pierced with the juice of the woad.

Their manners and habits were simple, but their religion was decidedly of an evil character. It was cruel and gloomy. They thought that danger might be turned aside, and their gods appeased, by offering human sacrifices.

They frequently opened the bodies of the victims, and pretended to be able to foretell future events by the appearances they beheld in

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