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Company was abrogated, but the road was again leased in 1867 and operated by the Company.

About 1867, the Hicksville and Cold Spring Railroad Company disappears and it is supposed was absorbed into this Company.

June 9, 1870, the Smithtown and Port Jefferson Railroad Company, and on December 30, 1870, the New York and Rockaway Railroad Company, were incorporated in the interests of this Company.

In May, 1874, the Company had taken a lease of the Newtown and Flushing Rail Road, which road, according to the later reports, was not operated after 1876, but which appears to have been finally purchased by this Company in April, 1889.

In June, 1874, the Whitestone and Westchester Railroad Company was consolidated with several other companies to form The Flushing, North Shore & Central Railroad Company, which was later in 1876 leased by The Long Island Railroad Company.

May 1, 1876, the entire systems of The Southern Railroad Company of Long Island and The Flushing, North Shore & Central Railroad Company, including roads and routes originally covered by the charters of the Hempstead and Rockaway Railroad Company, The New York and Hempstead Plains Rail Road Company, The Rockaway Railway Company, the Hunter's Point and South Side Railroad Company, the Far Rockaway Branch Railroad Company of Queens County, New York, The South Side Railroad Company of Long Island, the Flushing Railroad Company, The New York and Flushing Rail Road Company, The North Shore Rail Road Company, the Flushing and Woodside. Railroad Company, The Central Railroad Company of Long Island, the Central Railroad Extension Company, The Flushing and North Side Railroad Company, the Roslyn and Huntington Railroad Company, the North Shore and Port Washington Railroad Company, and the Whitestone and Westchester Railroad Company were acquired by lease.

October 23, 1877, Thomas R. Sharp was appointed receiver of the road and took possession of the property October 26th. October 17, 1881, Receiver Sharp was discharged and the Company reorganized with Austin Corbin as president.

By deed, dated October 22, 1879, the Company acquired from

Egisto P. Fabbri and wife a portion of the old Central Railroad of Long Island, extending westerly from its junction with the socalled "Stewart's Line" to Alley Road at Creedmoor. The franchise of The Central Railroad Company of Long Island was not included in this deed, but was conveyed in a deed dated February 7, 1906. In 1879 that portion of the old Central Railroad Company known as the "Stewart Line," extending from Hinsdale to Bethpage, with a branch from Garden City to Hempstead, having passed under direct control of the heirs of A. T. Stewart, was leased to the Company and finally purchased June 1, 1892.

June 3, 1879, the property and franchises of The South Side Railroad Company of Long Island, and its successor, The Southern Railroad Company of Long Island (no. 613), were sold under foreclosure, and on November 22, 1879, were conveyed to the Brooklyn and Montauk Railroad Company. By lease at some time prior to these proceedings The Long Island Railroad Company acquired this railroad and operated it throughout the proceedings. A new lease was made October 1, 1879, for a period of 50 years and finally acquired through merger October 5, 1889.

In February, 1880, the New York and Long Beach Railroad Company came under control of The Long Island Railroad Company, and its road appeared as a branch of this Company about that time.

March 22, 1880, The New York and Flushing Rail Road Company was leased directly to this Company, it having formerly been leased to The South Side Railroad Company of Long Island, which company was a lessor of this Company.

In 1879-80 certain of the underlying mortgages of The Flushing, North Shore & Central Railroad system were foreclosed, and on March 21, 1881, The Long Island City and Flushing Railroad Company (no. 331) was incorporated to acquire all of this property except that portion of the old Central Railroad of Long Island and the Central Railroad Extension extending east from Lawrence street, Flushing. Finally, through a series of leases, the railroads of the new company were acquired by The Long Island City and Flushing Railroad Company, and the Company continued to be operated, under lease, as a part of the system of the Long Island Railroad, into which they became merged April 2, 1889.

March 26, 1880, an agreement was entered into by the Company, its receiver, Thomas R. Sharp, and The New York, Woodhaven and Rockaway Railroad Company, whereby the latter was to furnish funds for the construction of a second track parallel to the existing track of the Brooklyn and Montauk Railroad from the Fresh Pond station to Hunter's Point. Upon the completion of this track and the completion of The New York, Woodhaven and Rockaway Railroad from Woodhaven northerly to a connection with the Brooklyn and Montauk Railroad between Richmond Hill and Glendale, the Company was to give to The New York, Woodhaven and Rockaway Railroad trackage rights to Hunter's Point and Bushwick, and depot facilities at these points; the Company to haul The New York, Wood· haven and Rockaway Company's trains to the Flatbush avenue station. The Company also agreed not to run any trains between Rockaway Beach and its termini at Hunter's Point, Bushwick and Flatbush avenues, on condition that The New York, Woodhaven and Rockaway Railroad Company should furnish adequate service on these lines. Another provision in the contract was that The New York, Woodhaven and Rockaway Company was not to extend its lines west of its junction with the Brooklyn and Montauk Railroad in the direction of either Bushwick or Hunter's Point or west of East New York. By a supplementary agreement, dated December 22, 1883, this agreement was continued for 50 years from October 1, 1879.

April 27, 1882, the Company leased The New York and Manhattan Beach Railway and its subsidiary lines, The New York, Bay Ridge and Jamaica Railroad and the Glendale and East River Railroad for a period of 99 years from May 1, 1882.

In the Company's report for 1883, it appears that the Company had leased the Newtown and Flushing Rail Road, the New York and Rockaway Railroad and the Smithtown and Port Jefferson Railroad in 1873, and that in 1882 the Company had purchased the outstanding bonds and stock of the New York and Long Beach Railroad Company.

February 24, 1883, The Long Island City and Manhattan Beach Railroad Company was incorporated in the interest of this Company. This road, upon completion, was leased by the Company.

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August 27, 1885, The New York and Manhattan Beach Railway Company, The New York, Bay Ridge and Jamaica Railroad Company, and The Long Island City and Manhattan Beach Railroad Company were consolidated to form The New York, Brooklyn and Manhattan Beach Railway Company. The stock control of this new company remained with The Long Island Railroad Company, which took a lease of the consolidated company's roads, October 1, 1885.

In 1886 the Company purchased the Long Beach Marine Railway Company.

September 1, 1887, the Company leased to The New York and Rockaway Beach Railway Company the Rockaway Branch Railroad, extending from New York and Rockaway Beach Junction to the village of Far Rockaway.

April 2, 1889, the Company absorbed by merger The Long Island City and Flushing Railroad Company (no. 331).

June 25, 1889, the Company leased the road of the Oyster Bay Extension Railroad Company, which had been organized as a subsidiary concern, August 31, 1886.

October 5, 1889, the Company absorbed by merger the Brooklyn and Montauk Railroad Company (no. 55).

April 15, 1890, The Atlantic Avenue Elevated Railroad Company was incorporated as a subsidiary company, for the purpose of constructing an elevated railroad in Atlantic avenue and on other streets in the city of Brooklyn.

April 27, 1891, the Company filed in the office of the secretary of state a certificate of merger of The New York and Flushing Rail Road Company.

January 26, 1892, The New York Bay Extension Railroad Company was incorporated as a subsidiary of this Company, for the purpose of constructing a line from a point near Garden City to a point in East New York, to form a connection with The New York, Brooklyn and Manhattan Beach Railway Company.

June 1, 1892, the Company purchased the "Stewart Railroad," extending from Floral Park to Bethpage, about 14.67 miles in length, and from Garden City to Hempstead, about 1.77 of a mile. in length. This purchase does not appear in the Company's reports until 1893.

July 11, 1892, The Long Island Railroad Company, North Shore Branch, was incorporated as a subsidiary company, and on September 23, 1892, was consolidated with the Smithtown and Port Jefferson Railroad Company to form another corporation, known as The Long Island Railroad Company, North Shore Branch, all the stock being held by the Long Island Company.

May 11, 1893. The Montauk Extension Railroad Company was incorporated in the interest of the Company to construct a road from Bridgehampton to Montauk.

The Long Island Railroad Company some time during 1893 acquired the stock control of the Prospect Park and Coney Island Rail Road Company, which had been incorporated as a subsidiary

company.

April 15, 1896, the Great Neck and Port Washington Railroad Company was incorporated as a subsidiary of this Company for the purpose of constructing an extension of its North Shore division to Port Washington.

In 1897 a new branch, known as The New York Bay Extension Railroad, extending from Garden City to Valley Stream, a distance of 6.12 miles, was opened for traffic as a leased line of this Company.

June 30, 1897, the Company leased the railroad of the South Brooklyn Railroad and Terminal Company.

March 5, 1898, the Company entered upon the policy of acquir. ing stock control of street railways. On this date the Company acquired the stock of the Huntington Railroad Company, incorporated May 13, 1890.

March 16, 1898, at a foreclosure sale, the Company bid in the property of the Rockaway Village Railroad Company (no. 584), and, on August 5, 1898, transferred the bid to the Ocean Electric Railway Company on terms which included the acquisition by the Company of $30,000 out of a total of $50,000 of the Ocean Electric Railway Company's capital stock, and $20,000 out of a total of $100,000 of that Company's authorized 20-year five per cent first mortgage bonds. The Ocean Electric Railway Company (no. 532) was the second of the street railway companies over which this Company acquired control.

April 13, 1898, the Company entered into an agreement known

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