Roman Antiquities: Or An Account of the Manners and Customs of the Romans ...

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Blackie & Son, 1835 - Rome - 528 pages

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Page 355 - The tunica or tunic, was a white woollen vest, which came down a little below the knees before, and to the middle of the leg behind, and was fastened about the waist by a girdle, which also served as a purse.
Page 267 - IDUS, the ides, from the obsolete verb iduare, to divide ; because the ides divided the month. The nones were so called, because counting inclusively, they were nine days from the ides. In March, May, July, and October, the nones fell on the seventh, and the ides on the fifteenth.
Page 506 - Dionysius informs us, further, that this public land, by the negligence of the magistrates, had been suffered to fall into the possession of rich men ; but that, notwithstanding this, a division of the lands would have taken place under this law, if Cassius had not included among the receivers of the bounty the Latins and Hernici, whom he had but a little while before made citizens.
Page 414 - ... rewards which he had received for his valour were displayed, together with the spoils and standards he had taken from the enemy. At the funerals of renowned commanders were carried images or representations of the countries they had subdued, and the cities they had...
Page 25 - Anciently this right of images was peculiar to the patricians ; but afterwards the plebeians also acquired it, when admitted to curule offices. Those who were the first of their family that had raised themselves to any curule office, were called Homines NOVI, new men or upstarts.
Page 2 - This number of 300 continued, with small variation, to the times of Sylla, who increased it ; but how many he added is uncertain. It appears there were at least above 400, Cic.
Page 255 - This accident was always esteemed unlucky, and expiated by offering extraordinary sacrifices. The fire was lighted up again, not from another fire, but from the rays of the sun. Consult Lipsius, " De Vesta et Vestatibus Syntagma,
Page 260 - In sacrifices it was requisite that those who offered them should come chaste and pure ; that they should bathe themselves ; be dressed in white robes, and crowned. with the leaves of that tree which was thought most acceptable to the god whom they worshipped. Sometimes also in the garb of suppliants, with dishevelled hair, loose robes, and barefooted.
Page 326 - First went musicians of various kinds, singing and playing triumphal songs; next were led the oxen to be sacrificed, having their horns gilt, and their heads adorned...
Page 400 - If he died intestate, and without children, she inherited his whole fortune as a daughter. If he left children, she had an equal share with them. If she committed any fault the...

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