Page images
PDF
EPUB

CONTENTS.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

CHAP. IV.

1018 - 1384,

FROM THE FORMATION OF HOLLAND TO THE DEATH OF LOUIS DE MALE.

Origin of Holland. - Its first Count. - Aggrandisement of Flanders. - Its

growing Commerce. — Fisheries. - Manufactures. — Formation of the

County of Guelders — And of Brabant. - State of Friesland. - State of

the Provinces. — The Crusades. — Their good Effects on the State of the

Netherlands. - Decline of the Feudal Power - And Growth of the In.

fluence of the Towns. — Great Prosperity of the Country. - The Flem.

ings take up Arms against the French - Drive them out of Bruges -

And defeat them in the Battle of Courtrai. – Popular Success in Brabant.

- Its Confederation with Flanders. — Rebellion of Bruges against the

Count - And of Ghent under James d'Artaveldt. - His Alliance with

England. - His Power - And Death. - Independence of Flanders. –

Battle of Roosbeke. - Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, obtains the

Sovereignty of Flanders.

Page 27

CHAP. V.

1384-1506.

FROM THE SUCCESSION OF PHILIP THE BOLD TO THE COUNTY OF FLANDERS

TO THE DEATH OF PHILIP THE FAIR.

Philip succeeds to the Inheritance of Brabant. - Makes War on England as

a French Prince - Flanders remaining neuter. - Power of the Houses

of Burgundy and Bavaria - And Decline of public Liberty. - Union of

Holland, Hainault, and Brabant. - Jacqueline Countess of Holland and

Hainault — Flies from the Tyranny of her Husband, John of Brabant,

and takes Refuge in England. - Murder of John the Fearless, Duke of

Burgundy. — Accession of his Son, Philip the Good. — His Policy. -

Espouses the Cause of John of Brabant against Jacqueline. - Deprives her

of Hainault, Holland, and Zealand. - Continues his Persecution, and de.

spoils her of her last Possession and Titles. - She marries a Gentleman

of Zealand - And dies. - Peace of Arras. - Dominions of the House of

Burgundy equal to the present Extent of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

Rebellion of Ghent. - Affairs of Holland and Zealand. - Charles the

Rash.-His Conduct in Holland.-Succeeds his Father.- Effects of Philip's

Reign on the Manners of the People. - Louis XI. - Death of Charles,

and Succession of Mary. Factions among her Subjects. — Marries Maxi-

milian of Austria. - Battle of Guinegate. — Death of Mary. - Maximilian

unpopular. — Imprisoned by his Subjects. - Released. - Invades the Ne.

therlands. — Succeeds to the Imperial Throne by the Death of his Father.

- Philip the Fair proclaimed Duke and Count.-His wise Administra.

tion. - Affairs of Friesland. Of Guelders. - Charles of Egmont.-Death

of Philip the Fair.

• 43

CHAP. VI.

1506 - 1555.

FROM THE GOVERNMENT OF MARGARET OF AUSTRIA TO THE ABDICATION

OF THE EMPEROR CHARLES V.

Margaret of Austria invested with the Sovereignty. - Her Character and

Government. Charles, Son of Philip the Fair, created Duke of

[merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

1566-1573.

TO THE ADMINISTRATION OF REQUESENS.

Philip's Vindictiveness and Hypocrisy. - Progress of Protestantism. - Gra-

dual Dissolution of the Conspiracy. - Artifices of Philip and the Court

to disunite the Pçotestants. — Firmness of the Prince of Orange. - Con.

ference at Termonde. — Egmont abandons the Patriot Cause. — Fatal

Effects of his Conduct. - Commencement of Hostilities. - Siege of

Valenciennes. Protestant Synod at Antwerp. - Haughty Conduct of

the Government. — Royalists repulsed at Bois-le-duc. - Battle of Oster-

weel, and Defeat of the Patriots. - Antwerp again saved by the Firmness

and Prudence of the Prince of Orange. - Capitulation of Valenciennes.

Successes of the Royalists. - Death of De Brederode. - New Oath of

Allegiance - Refused by the Prince of Orange and others. — The Prince

resolves on voluntary Bañishment, and departs for Germany.

Example is followed by the Lords. - Extensive Emigration. — Arrival of

the Duke of Orleans. - Egmont's Humiliation. — Alva's Powers.

Arrest of Egmont and others. — Alva's first Acts of Tyranny. - Council

of Blood.- Recall of the Government.-Alva's Character.-He summons

the Prince of Orange, who is tried by Contumacy. - Horrors committed

by Alva. — Desolate State of the Country. – Trial and Execution of

Egmont and Horn. — The Prince of Orange raises an Army in Ger.

many, and opens his first Campaign in the Netherlands. - Battle of

Heiligerlee. Death of Adolphus of Nassau. - Battle of Jemminghem.

- Success and skilful Conduct of Alva. — Dispersion of the Prince of

Orange's Army. Growth of the naval Power of the Patriots. - Inun.

dation in Holland and Friesland. — Alva reproached by Philip. - Duke

of Medina-Celi appointed Governor. - Is attacked, and his Fleet de.

stroyed by the Patriots. — Demands his Recall. — Policy of the English

Queen, Elizabeth. — The Dutch take Brille. - General Revolt in Holland

and Zealand. - New Expedition of the Prince of Orange. Siege of

Mons. — Success of the Prince. - Siege of Haerlem - Of Alkmaer, -

Removal of Alva. — Don Luis Zanega y Requesens appointed Governor-

General.

Page 118

[blocks in formation]

CHAP. X1.

1576-1580.

TO THE RENUNCIATION OF THE SOVEREIGNTY OF SPAIN AND THE DECLARATION

OF INDEPENDENCE.

Don John of Austria, Governor-General, arrives in the Netherlands. -

His Character and Conduct. - The States send an Envoy to Elizabeth of

England. She advances them a Loan of Money. - The Union of

Brussels. - The Treaty of Marche-en-Famenne, called the Perpetual

Edict. — The impetuous Conduct of Don John excites the public Suspi-

cion. - He seizes on the Citadel of Namur, - The Prince of Orange is

named Protector of Brabant. — The People destroy the Citadels of Ant.

werp and other Towns. - The Duke of Arschot is named Governor of

Flanders. He invites the Archduke Mathias to accept the Government

of the Netherlands. — Wise Conduct of the Prince of Orange. - Ryhove

and Hembyse possess themselves of supreme Power at Ghent. - The

Prince of Orange goes there and establishes Order. - The Archduke

Mathias is installed. - The Prince of Parma arrives in the Netherlands,

and gains the Battle of Gemblours. — Confusion of the States-general.

The Duke of Alençon comes to their Assistance. - Dissensions among

the Patriot Chiefs. — Death of Don John of Austria. - Suspicions of his

having been poisoned by Order of Philip II. — The Prince of Parma is

declared Governor-General. – The Union of Utrecht. - The Prince of

Parma takes the Field. — The Congress of Cologne rendered fruitless by

the Obstinacy of Philip. - The States-general assemble at Antwerp, and

issue a Declaration of National Independence. — The Sovereignty of the

Netherlands granted to the Duke of Alençon.

Page 150

« PreviousContinue »