The Rubicon; Or, Historical Allusions Familiarized,: In Sketches of Early Roman History

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J. Souter, School Library, 73, St. Paul's Churchyard., 1830 - History, Ancient - 171 pages

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Page 12 - And if ye do good to them which do good to you, what thank have ye? For sinners also do even the same. And if ye lend to them of whom ye hope to receive, what thank have ye? For sinners also lend to sinners, to receive as much again.
Page 12 - For if ye love them which love you, what thank have ye? For sinners also love those that love them. And if ye do good to them which do good to you, what thank have ye? for sinners also do even the same. And if ye lend to them of whom ye hope to receive, what thank have ye? for sinners also lend to sinners, to receive as much again. But love your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest. For He is kind unto...
Page 128 - ... the efficient ally of the Romans in the last campaign of the war, all the territory which she had wrested from him. Carthage also gave up her fleet and her elephants to the Romans, and agreed to pay to Rome a yearly tribute of two hundred talents, and bound herself to enter upon no war in the future without the consent of the Romans. Thus ended the Second Punic War, after a continuance of seventeen years (BC 218201), in the humiliation of Carthage, which now virtually lost her national independence...
Page 24 - How happy is the blameless vestal's lot ? The world forgetting, by the world forgot...
Page 10 - But, wrapp'd in night with terrours all his own, He speaks in thunder, when the deed is done. Hear him, ye Senates ! hear this truth sublime, " HE WHO ALLOWS OPPRESSION SHARES THE CRIME.
Page 53 - Thus resolved, they all for some time showed their spirit, and kept their word ; but soon they found, that instead of mortifying the belly by these means, they only undid themselves ; they languished for a while, and perceived, when too late, that it was owing to the belly that they had strength to work, or courage to mutiny.
Page 104 - Fabricius, it would be as easy to turn the sun from his course as thee from the path of honor ! " In gratitude for the noble conduct of Fabricius and the Roman Senate, Pyrrhus immediately sent Cineas to Rome with his thanks, and at once released all the Romans whom he had taken prisoners, and sent them home rich with presents. The Romans, nevertheless, still firmly...
Page 96 - The last good kins; whom willing Rome obey'd Was the poor offspring of a captive maid ; Yet he those robes of empire justly bore, Which Romulus, our sacred founder, wore: Nicely he gain'd, and well possest the throne, Not for his father's merit, but his own, And reign'd, himself a family alone. When...
Page 59 - ... dream, he flew to take up his mother, who had fallen at his feet, crying out, " Oh ! my mother, thou hast saved Rome, but lost thy son." He accordingly gave orders to draw off the army, pretending to the officers, that the city was too strong to be taken. Tullus, who had long envied Coriolanus, was not remiss in aggravating the lenity of his conduct to his countrymen.
Page 9 - E'en now, e'en now, on yonder western shores, Weeps pale despair, and writhing anguish roars ; E'en now in Afric's groves, with hideous yell. Fierce slavery stalks, and slips the dogs of hell; From vale to vale the gathering cries rebound. And sable nations tremble at the sound ! Ye bands of senators ! whose suffrage sways Britannia's realms, whom either Ind 'obeys ; Who right the injured, and reward the brave, Stretch your strong arm, for ye have power to save!

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