American History Told by Contemporaries ...

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Albert Bushnell Hart, John Gould Curtis
Macmillan, 1924 - United States - 20 pages

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Page 261 - Happy the man*, whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air In his own ground. Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire, Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter, fire.
Page 623 - I consider it an indispensable duty to close this last act of my official life by commending the interests of our dearest country to the protection of Almighty God and those who have the superintendence of them to His holy keeping.
Page 230 - Seest thou a man diligent in his calling, he shall stand before kings, he shall not stand before mean men...
Page 155 - Fines or Forfeitures due unto Us, fit Objects of Our Mercy, to pardon all such Offenders...
Page 399 - That all supplies to the Crown being free gifts of the people, it is unreasonable and inconsistent with the principles and spirit of the British Constitution, for the people of Great Britain to grant to His Majesty the property of the colonists.
Page 463 - The winds ceased to murmur; the thunders expired; Perfumes as of Eden flowed sweetly along, And a voice as of angels, enchantingly sung: " Columbia, Columbia, to glory arise, The queen of the world, and the child of the skies.
Page 116 - Then Samuel took a stone, and set it between Mizpeh and Shen, and called the name of it Eben-ezer, or the stone of Help *, saying, Hitherto hath the LORD helped us.
Page 156 - New-York for our approbation or disallowance of the same as also duplicates thereof by the next conveyance and in case any or all of the said laws...
Page 399 - That it is inseparably essential to the freedom of a people, and the undoubted right of Englishmen, that no taxes be imposed on them but with their own consent, given personally or by their representatives.
Page 487 - ... should not have been, the greatest part of the war, inferior to the enemy, indebted for our safety to their inactivity, enduring frequently the mortification of seeing inviting opportunities to ruin them pass unimproved for want of a force which the country was completely able to afford, and of seeing the country ravaged, our towns burnt, the inhabitants plundered, abused, murdered, with impunity from the same cause.

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