A Peep at the Pilgrims in Sixteen Hundred Thirty-six: A Tale of Olden Times

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Phillips, Sampson, 1850 - Massachusetts - 463 pages
 

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Page 218 - They thai tarry long at the wine ; they that go to seek mixed wine. Look not thou upon the wine when it is red, when it giveth his colour in the cup, when it movctb itself aright. At the last it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth like an adder.
Page 153 - He that ruleth his spirit, is better than he that taketh a city,
Page 218 - They that tarry long at the wine; they that go to seek mixed wine. Look not thou upon the wine when it is red, when it giveth his colour in the cup, when it moveth itself aright: at the last it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth like an adder.
Page 292 - Entreat me not to leave thee, nor to return from following after thee ; for whither thou goest I will go, and where thou lodgest I will lodge ; thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God : where thou diest will I die, and there will I be buried.
Page 93 - But yet the Lord that is on high, Is more of might by far, Than noise of many waters is, Or great sea-billows are.
Page 127 - ... just, when we will not hear our King speak and plead, not to save Himself but us, to speak for our peace, and innocency, and salvation, to prevent our ruin and our intolerable calamity. Certainly we are much in love with the wages of death, when we cannot endure to hear God call us back, and ' stop our ears against the voice of the charmer, charm he never so wisely...
Page 70 - Lord, and to sing praises unto his name ; to tell of his loving kindness early in the morning, and of his truth in the night season ?' Upon the whole of this matter, let every master thus question with himself. Is it not for great ends and reasons that God has placed me at the head of a family? Am I not accountable...
Page 66 - There is a difference between a wife and a virgin. ' The unmarried woman careth for the things of the Lord, that she may be holy, both in body and in spirit ; but she that is married careth for the things of the world, that she may please her husband.
Page 294 - I must admire thee more for so denying, Than I had dared if thou hadst fondly granted. Thou dost devote thyself to utterest peril, And me to deepest anguish ; yet even now Thou art lovelier to me in thy cold severity, Flying me, leaving me without a joy, Without a hope on earth, without thyself; Thou art lovelier now than if thy yielding soul Had smiled on me a passionate...

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