The Hannibalian war, part of the 21st and 22nd books of Livy, adapted by G.C. Macaulay

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Page vii - Roman senate was the noblest embodiment of the nation, and in consistency and political sagacity, in unanimity and patriotism, in grasp of power and unwavering courage, the foremost political corporation of all times — an "assembly of kings," which well knew how to combine despotic energy with republican self-devotedness.
Page 52 - Haec simul increpans quum ocius signa convelli iuberet et ipse in equum insiluisset, equus repente corruit consulemque lapsum super caput effudit. Territis omni215 bus, qui circa erant, velut foedo omine incipiendae rei, insuper nuntiatur, signum omni vi moliente signifero convelli nequire. Conversus ad nuntium 'Num litteras quoque...
Page 58 - Senatum praetores per dies aliquot ab orto usque ad occidentem solem in curia retinent, consultantes quonam duce aut...
Page 100 - A primary object of the Series will be to impart knowledge in a way both interesting and sound, that the students who use the books may really be attracted by the information given in the Notes, and may therefore go on into higher walks of learning with genuine zeal, feeling confident that they have a solid basis in the knowledge already acquired. With this object an endeavour will be made to illustrate each author from all the various points of view that have been brought out by modern learning....
Page 98 - Passignano : he had made a forced march, and had arrived at his position so late that he could not examine the ground before him. Early the next morning he set forward again ; the morning mist hung thickly over the lake and the low grounds, leaving the heights, as is often the case, quite clear. Flaminius, anxious to overtake his enemy, rejoiced in the friendly veil which thus concealed his advance, and hoped to fall upon Hannibal's army...
Page 100 - BOOKS, selected from the best Greek and Latin authors, with short introductions, and full elementary Notes at the end, designed for the use of the Lower Forms of Public Schools, of Private Preparatory Schools, of Candidates for Junior Local Examinations, and of beginners generally. The...
Page 56 - Magnae partis fuga inde primum coepit; et iam nee lacus nee montes pavori obstabant; per omnia arta praeruptaque velut caeci evadunt, armaque et viri super alium alii praecipitantur. Pars magna, ubi locus fugae deest, per prima vada paludis in aquam progressi, quoad capitibus...
Page xiv - Plurimum audaciae ad pericula capessenda, plurimum consilii inter ipsa pericula erat. Nullo labore aut corpus fatigari aut animus vinci poterat. Caloris ac frigoris patientia par ; cibi potionisque desiderio 10 natural!, non voluptate modus finitus ; vigiliarum somnique nee die nee nocte discriminata tempora; id quod gerendis rebus superesset quieti datum...
Page 90 - Romans gained successes, which in some degree balanced the victorics of Hannibal. " The importance of the Spanish war cannot be estimated too highly ; for by disputing the possession of Spain, the Romans deprived their enemy of his best nursery of soldiers, from which otherwise he would have been able to raise army after army for the invasion of Italy. But its importance consisted not so much in the particular events, as in its being kept up at all : nor is there anything requiring explanation in...
Page vii - ... between the orders, — the Roman Senate was the noblest organ of the nation, and in consistency and political sagacity, in unanimity and patriotism, in grasp of power and unwavering courage, the foremost political corporation of all times ; still even now an ' Assembly of Kings/ which knew well how to combine despotic energy with republican self-devotion.

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