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INDEX

PRINCIPAL MATTERS.

or omission of it makes no alter-
ation in the sense of the word

48
St. Athanasius cited and explained

142
Attributes applied to the Son, such

as can belong to no creature 63
- strictly Divine and infinite

65
St. Austin vindicated 348
Author and Governor of the uni-

verse, whosoever is so, is, in the
Arian notion, allowed to be God

52

144

ADORATION, see Worship
Ante-Nicene writers, include the
Son in the one God

15
- admit no inferior God 39

disown creature-worship 175
Arians conceal their heretical te
nets under Catholic terms 88,

146
are afraid to express their
notions clearly

have more difficulties to get
over than the Catholics 120,

122, 125, 161, 252
the positions of some or
other of them in respect of the
Son

156
- the methods they made use
of to propagate their heresy 157

how far they agree with, or
differ from, the Sabellians 251
- misrepresent the Catholic
doctrine

214
their notions of the Trinity
not more intelligible than the
Catholic

244
- supposing the case doubtful,
not on so safe a side as the Ca-
tholics

336
what is requisite to defend
their scheme

340
Ariminum (the Council of) vainly
opposed to the Council of Nice

331
Article ó before Osos, the addition

VOL. I.

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Christ spake to the Jews in his own Eternity, a distinct idea from ne-
Person, when he assumed the cessary existence

85
titles of the supreme God. 24

how abused when attributed
called God in Scripture in to the Son by Dr. Clarke 153
as high a sense as the Father Eternity of the Son, described in
himself

41 Scripture by the same phrases
called Jehovah in his own as that of the Father 80
Person

42

- and therefore the Scripture
- proved to be God from his . proof of the Father's eternity
being the object of religious given up by the Arians to avoid
worship

179 .that of the Son's
- proved to be God by nature, -- whether the Son's eternity

263 be necessary to his office and
Clemens of Alexandria cited and character

83
vindicated

77 - implies the Son to be neces-
Coeternity of the Logos with the sarily existent

87
Father asserted by the ancients Eusebius, cited and explained 12,

104

15, 60, 130, 135
Consubstantiality of the Son with
the Father, how eluded by the

F.
Arians, and how asserted by the Fathers, several points instanced
ancients

268 in which they are against the
Creation, the Scripture meaning of Arians

278
the word

- 138

how cited and made use of
Creation of the universe, attribut by Dr. Clarke

301
ed to the Son as much as to the what use to be made of them
Father
129 in controversies

321
implies an infinite power 135 - the advantage of a cause
Creature, the Son asserted to be that has them on its side 323

uncreated implicitly and con-
sequentially by the holy Scrip-

G.
tures

139 Generation of the Son, a threefold
the same affirmed directly, one asserted by the ancients,
by many of the ancients 140 and how distinguished 95

that he was created, not af- .-- they who assert the genera-
firmed or supposed by Origen tion of the Logos, or his filiation

ibid. to have been temporary; yet as-
no medium between being a sert his existence to have been
creature and being essentially coeternal with the Father's 103
God

: 148 - how far an explicit profes-

sion of the Son's eternal genera-
Divine attributes and powers at tion may be dispensed with 115

tributed to the Son, by Dr. God, what the word implies 36
Clarke in an equivocating sense - not merely relative

124 - denotes substance, and not
Divinity, how absurdly ascribed to dominion only

Christ by the Arians i x - his nature or essence denied
Dominion, not the full import of by the Eunomians and some of

the word God 35, 37, 265 the Arians to be above human
Doxologies of the ancient Church, comprehension

217
what judgment to be made of
them

185

H.
E.

Hypostasis, in what sense the an-
Mr. Emlyn noted 67,71, 133, 229, cient Catholia" professed three

Hypostases or one only 248

34

292

Son, either in the Scripture, or
by the ancients

6, 15
Origen's orthodoxy asserted and

vindicated 140, 177, 182

P.

46

Jehovah, Christ so called in his
own Person

42
- what the word signifies 44
- the incommunicable name

of the one true God
Jgnatius cited and explained 91
Individual, whether any thing in-
dividual can be communicated

122
Irenæus, whether he can be under-

stood to ascribe ignorance to
the Son

72
Judgment committed to the Son,

not the sole foundation of his
honour

197
Justin Martyr explained 93, 108

M. .
Metaphysics, the Catholics wrong-

fully charged with the abuse of
them

212, 228
Mysteries, what meant by believ-
ing them

218

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N.

211

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Subordinate God, the absurdity of

calling Christ so 3, 38, 39
- he being not subordinate in

nature or power, but only in
order

130
Substance not joined with relative

terms, when understood of any
thing extrinsic

35
One Divine substance, and
not three, professed by the an-
cient Catholics

248
Supreme God, Christ so, or not

God at all
Supremacy in order consistent

with equality of nature 205

97

0.

3

70

'o (the article) before Osòs makes

no alteration in the sense of the
word

48
Omniscience of the Son, as infinite

as the Father's
- asserted by the Ante-Nicene
writers

77
'Ouoouono;, what the word expresses

331
One God, or only true God, not as-

scribed to the Father, in oppo-
sition to, nor exclusive of, the

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227

"Keen begotten w

Trinity in unity, the modus of it

not to be too curiously inquired into

227 Tritheism, the charge of it removed from the Catholics 215

fixed upon the Arians 238

the medium between that and Sabellianism

234 - the sense of the ancient Fa

thers in relation to it 239 Two Gods, the consequence of the Arian scheme

56

166

Will, and arbitrary will, distinct things

90 - how the Son may be said to

have been begotten with the

will of the Father 89, 348 Worship (religious) appropriated

to the supreme God only, in Scripture

162 -- no distinction in Scripture

between absolute and inferior
worship
- the same proved from the
practice of the primitive martyrs

173 -- and from the doctrine of the ancient Church

that religious worship is due to Christ, proved from Scripture

178 - upon what principles given him by the primitive Christians

181 -- how the worship paid to the Son terminates in the Father

185 due to him as Creator and Preserver of the universe, and before the commencing of his mediatorial kingdom

0. Unity of Godhead, not to be in

ferred from unity of authority 55 - cannot be asserted but upon

an equality of nature, and unity of principle

240 Unity of Father and Son, in what

sense defended by the ancients

175

255

W. Whitby, (Dr.) an instance of his

unfair dealing in his authorities

93

short strictures upon his modest disquisitions

282 -- his notion of mysteries exposed, &c.

218

203

END OF VOL. I.

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