Pearl Harbor: The Verdict of History

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Open Road Media, May 6, 2014 - History - 827 pages
The New York Times–bestselling authors of Miracle at Midway delve into the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor during WWII in “a superb work of history” (Albuquerque Journal Magazine).

In the predawn hours of December 7, 1941, a Japanese carrier group sailed toward Hawaii. A few minutes before 8:00 a.m., they received the order to rain death on the American base at Pearl Harbor, sinking dozens of ships, destroying hundreds of airplanes, and taking the lives of over two thousand servicemen. The carnage lasted only two hours, but more than seventy years later, terrible questions remain unanswered.

How did the Japanese slip past the American radar? Why were the Hawaiian defense forces so woefully underprepared? What, if anything, did American intelligence know before the first Japanese pilot shouted “Tora! Tora! Tora!”? In this incomparable volume, Pearl Harbor experts Gordon W. Prange, Donald M. Goldstein, and Katherine V. Dillon tackle dozens of thorny issues in an attempt to determine who was at fault for one of the most shocking military disasters in history.

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User Review  - MasseyLibrary - LibraryThing

The previous book “At Dawn We Slept” was a re-creation of the apocalyptic events of December 7, 1941. This provocative sequel delves even further to examine the underlying causes of Pearl Harbor and ... Read full review

Pearl Harbor: the verdict of history

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Prange's twin volumes offer everything you always wanted to know about Pearl Harbor but were afraid to ask, plus pictures! Together, these tomes comprise an exhaustive study of the day that will live ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Alerted to Prevent Sabotage
iii
The Failure to Comprehend
iii
An Important Man in an Important Post
iii
Peculiar Complicated and Tense
iii
Always Striving for Perfection
iii
His Most Grievous Failure
iii
The Last Critical Stages
iii
It Is Inexplicable
iii

Too Deeply to Bury Their Hate
Bait for a Japanese Attack
To Avoid War with Japan
He Had Supreme Responsibility
On Lines of National Policy
Looking in the Wrong Direction
ADVISERS PLANNERS AND CHIEFS
ii
With Knives and Hatchets
ii
Unsurmountable Obstacles
ii
Crimination and Recrimination
ii
To Help and Serve
ii
Faults of Omission
ii
Outside of Effective Contact
ii
A Finger of Blame
ii
Primarily a Failure of Men
ii
The Pitfalls of Divided Responsibility
ii
A Lack of Imagination
ii
East Wind Rain
ii
FIELD COMMANDERS AND OPERATORS
iii
A Sentinel on Duty
iii
THE VIEW FROM THE CROWS NEST
iv
Blessed by the War God
v
A Strategic Imbecility
xv
A Mental Attitude
xxv
In the Wake of the Pearl Harbor Disaster
xxxiv
Remember Pearl Harbor
xliii
Notes
liv
Appendices
46
The Pearl Harbor Investigations
47
Japanese Proposals of November 20 1941
49
War Warning Messages of November 27 1941
50
Proposed Modus Vivendi
51
Japans Bomb Plot Message
54
The Hull Note of November 26 1941
55
Popov Questionnaire
57
Selected Bibliography
59
Index
70
Image Gallery
571
About the Authors
598
Copyright

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About the author (2014)

Gordon W. Prange (1910–1980) was a professor of history at the University of Maryland and a World War II veteran. He served as the chief historian on General Douglas MacArthur’s staff during the postwar military occupation of Japan. His 1963 Reader’s Digest article “Tora! Tora! Tora!” was later expanded into the acclaimed book At Dawn We Slept. After Prange’s death, his colleagues Donald M. Goldstein and Katherine V. Dillon completed several of his manuscripts, including At Dawn We Slept. Other works that Goldstein and Dillon finished include Miracle at MidwayPearl Harbor: The Verdict of History; December 7, 1941: The Day the Japanese Attacked Pearl Harbor; and Target Tokyo: The Story of the Sorge Spy Ring.

Donald M. Goldstein (1931–2017) was a retired United States Air Force officer; professor emeritus of public and international affairs at the University of Pittsburgh, where he taught for thirty-five years; a winner of two Peabody Awards; and author of many books. He also taught at the Air Force Academy, the Air War College, the Air Command and Staff College, the University of Tampa, and Troy State University. He was considered the leading authority on the Pearl Harbor attack.

Katherine V. Dillon (1916–2005) was a chief warrant officer, United States Air Force (retired), and longtime collaborator with Gordon W. Prange and Donald M. Goldstein on their work. She served during World War II and the Korean War.

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