Margaret and Henrietta

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American Tract Society, 1852 - Christian life - 78 pages

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Page 15 - This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that JESUS CHRIST came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am chief.
Page 15 - Seek ye the Lord while he may be found, call upon him while he is near...
Page 25 - THERE is a land of pure delight, Where saints immortal reign ; Eternal day excludes the night, And pleasures banish pain. 2 There everlasting spring abides, And never-fading flowers ; Death, like a narrow sea, divides This heavenly land from ours. 3 Bright fields beyond the swelling flood Stand dressed in living green ; So to the Jews fair Canaan stood, While Jordan rolled between.
Page 61 - Is it well with thee ? is it well with thy husband ? is it well with the child ? And she answered, It is well.
Page 67 - ... his ways are not as our ways, nor his thoughts as our thoughts.
Page 73 - I paused where two sweet sisters lay In death's unbroken rest. There was a marble seat Beside that couch of clay, Where oft the mournful mother sat To pluck the weeds away, And bless each infant bud, And every blossom fair, That breathed a sign of fragrance round The idols of her care.
Page 76 - They're here in this turfed bed — those tender forms, So kindly cherished, and so fondly loved, They're here — Sweet Sisters ! pleasant in their lives, And not in death divided. Sure tis meet, Each blooming one, should linger here, and learn, How quick the transit to the silent tomb. 158. Forgive O Lord ! the parents wish, That Death had spared their son, And help them from their hearts to say,
Page 73 - mid the hallowed mound With velvet verdure dressed, I paused where two sweet sisters lay In death's unbroken rest. There was a marble seat Beside that couch of clay, Where oft the mournful mother...
Page 35 - I think I have in my affliction, that I can say, unless thy law had been my delight, I should have perished in my trouble.
Page 78 - Ye no more shall see them bearing Pangs that woke the dovelike moan, Still for your affliction caring, Though forgetful of their own. Ere the bitter cup they tasted Which the hand of care doth bring ; Ere the glittering pearls were wasted From glad childhood's fairy string...

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