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236

SECT. I.

The Being and Attributes of God established, as the Foundation

of Morality

Page 228

Something exifts, a Truth, which no Man can doubt

ib.

Something must, therefore, have always existed, which exifts

neceffarily

ib.

For an infinite Succession of dependent Causes produced one by

another is not a satisfying Account, how something comes to

exist now

229

Nor is the material World, nor Chance, the original Cause of

Existence

ib.

The Firft Cause of Existence must be One, viz. perfekt in all

possible consistent Attributes-in Wisdom-in Goodness-in

Power--in Truth, or Rectitudeand in every other natural

and moral Attribute

230

That Virtue, or Rettitude, in a created Being, is, a Conformity

in Disposition and Practice to the necesary and unchangeable

Rettitude of the Divine Nature

234

The first Cause not to be considered, as made up of his several

Attributes, any more than the Human Mind as made up of

its several Faculties

235

An Essay toward the most perfect Idea, the Human Mind can

form of Deity

SECT. II.

An Idea of the Divine Scheme in Creation

237

That an Universe must, in Consequence of the infinite Wisdom

of the Creator, be complete, and without Chasms between the

various Orders of Beings.

The Happiness of conscious Beings, the only End, for which they

were brought into Existence

240

Happiness, its Foundation

ib.

luiversal and regular Concurrence of all parts of the System to

che great End absolutely necessary to Universal Perfection and

Happiness

242

Happiness of different conscious Beings different, and in what
it respectively consists

jb.

The inanimate, or material Part of the Creation, how made to

answer the Divine Intention

243

The animal, irrational Natures, how brought to perform their

Part in the Universal Scheme

245

The rational IVorld of incomparally greater Consequence in the
Universal System, ihan the other two

ib,

SECT. III.

Necessary, in order to understand, wherein the Concurrence of

the Human Species, with the Universal Scheme, amfifis, to

consider a little the Nature of Man

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That we are equally at a Lofs about the effential Nature of our

Bodies and our Souls

Page 245

Wherein our Superiority to the animal Creation chiefly confifts ib.

Our Nature and State altogether incomprehensible, without taking

in the View of our being intended for Immortality

247

Proofs of the Immortality of the Soul taken first from its Nature ib.

Dificulty of the mutual Impresions made by the Soul and Body,

cleared up, so far as relates to their being of different Natures 250

Presumptions in Favour of the Opinion of the Immortality of

the Soul, and its paling through different succeffive States,

from Analogy

253

Proofs of the Immortality of the Soul, and a future State, from

the Moral Attributes of God, the most convincing of any, ex-

cept those which Revelation yields

254

Unequal Distribution of Happiness among the inferior Creatures,

confidered, so far as it affects the Argument

255

The most elevated Mind has the best Assurances of its own Im-

mortality

261

SECT. IV.

Man's present Station, in regard to his Prospect for Futurity,

desirable

261

That the Connection between the Conduct of moral Agents and

their final State, with respect to Happiness or Misery, is rea-

fonable and necessary

263

That there is, norwithpanding this, an absolute, independent

Rectitude, and the contrary, in the Actions of moral Agents,

separate from ail Consideration of consequent Happiness, or

Misery, which Rettitude is founded in ihe Divine Attribute

of Rettitude

264

That however, the natural Consequences of Actions, are in gene-

ral a very sufficient Criterion, by which to try, whether they

be morally good, or evil

265

No poflible Scheme for bringing the human Species to a spontane-

ous Choice of Virtue, or to a due Concurrence in their Sphere,

with the general Intention of the Governor of the World; but

Discipline

266

I hat Human Virtue consists in the proper Application, and due

Improvement, of our several Powers

Human Liberty of Agency established, and Objections answered ib.

Probable that all created, rational Beings are formed to Virtue

in the fame Manner as our Species, to wit, by Discipline,

and Habit

271

SECT. V.

That the State, we find ourselves in, is very proper for a State

of Discipline in Virtue

273

Various
327

Turious Instructions for this purpose presented to us by Nature,

by our own Bodies and Minds, by the Constitution and Course

of the World, and above all by Revelation

Page 274

The whole Species formed naturally capable of future Happiness 278

Difficulties in tbe Divine Oeconomy of the moral World at-

tempted to be cleared up

280

Difficulties to be expected, and even to be looked upon as a Beauty,

in a Scheme lo auguft and extensive

289

SECT. VI.

That our Species, and all rational Agents, in order to their per-

forming their Part properly, and contributing to Universal

Perfection and Happiness, muft resolve to act agreeably to the

threefold

Obligation, which they are under, to wit, with Re-

gard to Themselves, their Fellow-creatures, and their Creator 291

Our Duty, with respect to Ourselves, confifts in the proper Care

of the two parts of our Nature, the mental * and the bodily ib.

of the Passions or Motions of the Mind

293

Previous Directions necessary toward the due Regulation of the

Paffions

294

Absurdity of Pride, and Advantages of Humility

296

Neceffity of Self-knowledge, and of Self-reverence

299

General Rule for the Conduct of the Pallions

301

Of the Passion of Love, or Desire, its proper Objects, and due

Regulation

302

Of Salf-love

304

Of Ambition, or Desire of Praise

305

Of Anger

306

Of the Pasions of Envy, Malice, and Revenge

309

Of Sympathy

310

Of Fear

ib.

Of Grief

311

Of the Love of Life

312

Of the Love of Riches

313

Of the Appetites of Hunger and Thirst, the Use and Abuse of

them

314

Of the mutual Desires of the Sexes

319

Of the Love of Sleep and Indulgence of Diversionsand of

Finery in Dress

321

Summary of our Duty to our Fellow-creatures

ib.

of

• Improvement of the Understanding treated of in the foregoing Book,

408

Revelation

Revelation given as a part of our Trial and Discipline Page 409
The World probably never wholly without a Revelation ib.
Previous Requifites for a proper Inquiry into Revelation

410

SECT. I.

Previous Obječtions against a Revelation in general, and that

of Scripture in particular, considered. And first, Of the

Need Mankind iood in, of express Informations from Hea-

ven, in Answer to the Objection of the Sufficiency of Human

Reason for all Moral Purposes

410

The Hottentots, and other barbarous Nations, the only fair

Examples of the Reach of mere Human Realon; mot Parts

of the civilized World having been partly illuminated by Re-

velation and therefore not altogether in a State of Nature 412

Of the State of the Antediluvian and succeeding Times, and

Countries, in which Revelation was but little known ib.

Of the Incapacity of mere Human Reason in religious Matters,

as it appears in the Mahometan and Popis Inventions

Revelation not intended to supersede, but improve Reason 417

Objection, Of the Abuse of Revelation, by weak or designing
Men, confidered

ib,

Of its being unworthy of the Divine Wisdom to have Recourse

to an extraordinary Interposition

418

Revelation analogous to the Constitution and Course of the IVorld 419

Absurdity of opposing Revelation on account of its not suiting our

pre-conceived Notions

421

Difficulties to be expected in a Revelation from God

423

Difficulties no Objection ; though direct Absurdities and Con-

424

That Revelation might be expected to suit our Notions in fome

particulars, and in others to differ from them

425

Of the Scripture-flyle

426

A Compendious View of the Scheme of Divine Revelation 431

Thoughts on the Extent of the Prospect opened by Revelation ib.

The Accounts given by it, plainly Juperior to Human Sagacity 432

Of the Creation--the Fall

, and Death, its Cousequence--of the
first Prophecy of a future Restoration of Mankind of the
general Deluge-the Noachic Dispensation--the Tower of
Babel—the Destruction of the Cities of the Plainthe Call
of Abraham-the miraculous History of bis Posterity the
Israelites and Jews--the Divine Dispensation to that people

and the Christian Scheme

434

Reflections on the whole

453

SECT.

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