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Many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased.- Dan. xii. 4.

SECOND EDITION,

WITH ADDITIONS AND ALTERATIONS.

NEW HAVEN:
PUBLISHED BY DANIEL MCLEOD.

PRINTED BY HEZEKIAH HOWE.

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Entered according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1831, by DanIEL MCLEOD, in the Clerk's office, of the District Court of Connecticut.

me.

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“ The next day as he was walking in the garden, and surveying the ruins of the house, he picked up part of a leaf of his Polyglott Bible, on which just these words were legible: Vade ; vende omnia quæ habes, et attolle crucem, et sequere Go: sell all that thou hast : and take

up
the
cross,

and follow me.”

The memory of Mr. John Wesley's escape is preserved in one of his early prints. Under his portrait there is a house in flames, with this inscription: “ Is not this a brand plucked out of the burning ?" He remembered this event ever after with the most lively gratitude, and more than once has introduced it in his writings.

The peculiar danger and wonderful escape of this child, excited a good deal of attention and inquiry at the time, especially among the friends and relations of the family. His brother Samuel, being then at Westminster, writes to his mother on this occasion in the following words, complaining that they did not inform him of the particulars. “I have not heard a word from the country since the first letter you sent me after the fire. I am quite ashamed to go to any of my relations. They ask me, whether my father means to leave Epworth ? whether he is building his house ? vy'ther he has lost all his books and papers ? if nothing was

1? what was the lost child ? a boy or a girl? what was

name?? &c. To all which I am forced to answer, I cannot tell; I do not know; I have not heard—I have asked my father some of these questions, but am still an ignoramus."

All the children received the first rudiments of learning from their mother, who was admirably qualified for this office in her own family. There is no evidence that the boys were ever put to any school in the country, their mother having a very bad opinion of the common methods of instruction and governing children. But she was not only attentive to their progress in learning, she likewise endeavor

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