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paid in 1857, calling in superior service, and attaching men to the occupation for life, rather than, as was too often the case in former times, making teaching a temporary expedient to provide the means to pursue some one of the professions.

I might enumerate the judicious programme prepared for the schools, the establishment of the Normal School for girls, the advancement of industrial work, now so popular but in former years lacking support among educators, and other elements of progress all around us, but the minds of most present are too familiar with his later work to make such enumeration in this presence necessary. Our thoughts at this time turn to him as the leading educator among the many noble men who have labored among us.

Dr. Philbrick was considered by some a timid man, but what was thought timidity was only extreme carefulness. He fully surveyed the whole field before making any important change, and his sagacity was such that, throughout his whole term of service, there was constant progress. There was never at any time a necessity for taking any step backwards.

Words of eulogy are too often exaggerated, and awaken in those who hear them painful comparison with the person's actual character; but to-night no sentiment of the kind suggests itself to any one present. We have listened to words truthful and sincere, bearing the cor. responding impress from the depths of feeling. If any other token of the estimation in which our departed friend was held was necessary, the throng of men, edumecin The gentleman opposite ERGIE romme osat always attended 11.- SITE II IV Ecraciate how fortunate ===::iniisist application for the ISSI: Sennen. ir te sperience in Connec

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paid in 1857, calling in superior service, and attaching men to the occupation for se, rather than, as was too often the case in former times, making teaching a temporary expedient to provide the means to pursue some one of the professions.

I might enumerate the judicious programme prepared for the schools, the estabishment of the Normal School for girls, the advancement of industrial work, now so popular but in former years lacking support among educators, and other elements of progress all around us, but the minds of most present are too familiar with his later work to make such enumeration in this presence necessary. Our thoughts at this time turn to him as the leading educator among the many noble men who have labored among us.

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cators from various parts of the state, who braved the most inclement day of the winter to stand sorrowing about his body in the beautiful home made desolate by his death, would attest the love and esteem in which he was held by those who had known him longest and best.

ADDRESS OF JOSHUA BATES, LL. D.

Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen of the Masters' Association:

I desire on this occasion to add my testimony to the many expressions of regard which have already been uttered in appreciation of our departed friend, the Hon. John D. Philbrick.

Born in the Granite State, of worthy parentage, Dr. Philbrick, amidst comfortable surroundings, was trained by the circumstances of his early life to habits of industry, and patient labor. He early learned that success in life could be secured only by personal effort and close application to all duties. It is a prominent characteristic of our republican institutions that many a boy early learns that he must depend on his own resources, often under almost insurmountable difficulties, in order to reach positions of usefulness and honor.

In the school, academy, and college, we find young Philbrick the vigorous boy, the industrious young man, assiduously devoting his time and talents to the faithful performance of all requirements.

Early in life, he made the decision to devote his energies to the profession of teaching. He was not, perhaps, what could be called a genius; yet his application was so untiring that he accomplished by industry

ness.

what genius often fails to do. He had unlimited influence with his classmates, and was thoroughly appreciated and respected by all the college officers.

Success in discipline and instruction in his first school experiences, led him soon to find and secure positions that developed great executive ability in all educational organization and administration. Blest in youth with robust health and a mind acute and vigorous, with a keen sense of moral rectitude, we find Dr. Philbrick in his manhood equipped and ready for all undertakings, however laborious and difficult. His character was remarkable for strong common sense, symmetry, and complete

He had a clear, intuitive insight into the character of men, as well as the relation and fitness of things. He exhibited, in a remarkable degree, kindness of heart and gentleness of spirit, but also uncommon strength of purpose. His social qualities were of a high order ; he was always cheerful and affable, which, with a cultivated intellect and courteous manner, made him the most delightful of companions. He acquired knowledge by constant study and retained it with great tenacity, and was able to apply it with skill and efficiency. His perceptive faculties were quick and his memory ready and retentive, so that in company, at home, and in his travels, he was at school, gathering knowledge for future use. He kindly sympathized with all teachers desirous to do their duty, and aided them in all their trials by judicious encouragement and advice.

My acquaintance with Dr. Philbrick dates from the year 1844, while he was connected as usher with the

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