Political Change in Southeast Asia

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 11, 2013 - Political Science
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Southeast Asia is a vast and complex region, comprising countries with remarkably diverse histories and cultures. Jacques Bertrand provides a fresh and highly original survey of politics and political change in this area of the world. Against the backdrop of rapid economic development and social transformation in several countries, he explores why some countries have adopted democratic institutions, while others have maintained stable authoritarian systems or accepted communist regimes. Bertrand presents a historically grounded account of capitalist countries and state-socialist countries, delving into the historical experience of individual countries, whilst simultaneously providing a comparative framework with which to draw parallels and foster a better understanding of the political and economic dynamics both within and between the countries. With powerful yet accessible analysis and detailed coverage, this book offers students and scholars a thorough and thought-provoking introduction to the political landscape of Southeast Asia.
 

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Contents

Figures and tables Figures 1 GDP growth in nonsocialist Southeast Asia page 37
2
Vietnam 144
6
Capitalism economic growth and political change
31
GDP per capita 19602009
34
GDP growth 19602009
36
Indonesia and TimorLeste
41
Indonesia
63
TimorLeste
69
Thailand
139
Part H Statesocialist countries and authoritarian
141
Vietnam
149
Vietnam
163
Cambodia and Laos
165
Cambodia
178
Laos
186
BurmaMyanmar
190

The Philippines
71
Philippines
90
Malaysia and Singapore
92
Malaysia
107
Singapore
117
Thailand
121
BurmaMyanmar
207
Southeast Asia in the twentyfirst century
209
References
229
Index
237
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About the author (2013)

Jacques Bertrand is Associate Professor of Political Science and a member of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Toronto. For the last few years, his research has focused on the effects of democratisation on sub-state nationalist mobilisation in Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand. He is the author of Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Indonesia (Cambridge University Press, 2004) and co-editor of Multination States in Asia: Accommodation or Resistance (Cambridge University Press, 2010).

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