The Complete Angler: Or, The Contemplative Man's Recreation

Front Cover
E. Stock, 1653 - Fishing - 246 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

II
1
III
40
IV
70
V
93
VI
126
VII
133
VIII
142
IX
161
X
174
XI
187
XII
196
XIII
220
XIV
235

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 62 - Scholar, thereabout we shall have a bite presently, or not at all: have with you Sir ! o
Page 67 - With coral clasps and amber studs: And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me and be my love.
Page 67 - IF all the world and love were young, And truth in every shepherd's tongue, These pretty pleasures might me move To live with thee and be thy love.
Page 63 - ... left this place, and entered into the next field, a second pleasure entertained me : 'twas a...
Page 64 - ... poetry, but choicely good, I think much better than the strong lines that are now in fashion in this critical age. Look yonder! on my word, yonder they both be a-milking again. I will give her the chub, and persuade them to sing those two songs to us.
Page 185 - And if myself have leave to see, I need not their light, having thee. Let others freeze with angling reeds, And cut their legs with shells and weeds, Or treacherously poor fish beset With strangling snare, or windowy net.
Page 53 - ... as a snail moves, to that chub you intend to catch ; let your bait fall gently upon the water three or four inches before him, and he will infallibly take the bait. And you will be as sure to catch him ; for he is one of the leather-mouthed fishes, of which a hook does scarce ever lose its hold ; and therefore give him play enough before you offer to take him out of the water.
Page 76 - CORIDON'S SONG Oh the sweet contentment The countryman doth find ! Heigh trolollie lollie loe, Heigh trolollie lee. That quiet contemplation Possesseth all my mind : Then care away, And wend along with me. For Courts are full of flattery, As hath too oft been tried ; Heigh trolollie lollie loe, etc.
Page 33 - Indeed, my friend, you will find Angling to be like the virtue of Humility, which has a calmness of spirit, and a world of other blessings attending upon it. Sir, this was the saying of that learned man, and I do easily believe that peace, and patience, and a calm content, did cohabit in the cheerful heart of Sir Henry Wotton, because I know that when he was beyond seventy years of age. he made this description of a part of the present pleasure that possessed him, as he sat quietly in a Summer's...
Page 52 - ... possible ; then put a grasshopper on your hook, and let your hook hang a quarter of a yard short of the water, to which end you must rest your rod on some bough of...

Bibliographic information