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THE

COLD-WATER-MAN;

OR,

A POCKET COMPANION FOR THE TEMPERATE.

BY DOCTOR SPRINGWATER,

OF

NORTH AMERICA.

No quarter for those who drink much or little. If there were no moderate

drinkers there would be no drunkarde.

ALBANY:

PRINTED BY PACKARD AND YAN BENTHUYSEN.

1832,

98

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

FROM
THE BEQUEST O
EVERT JANSEN:

Eniered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1832, by Packard & Van Benthuysen, in the Clerk's Office of the Southern District of New-York.

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ours.

er.

Go, little book, into this drunken world of

Frown upon drunkards. Reprove, most sharply, him who makes them. If possible, snatch from impending ruin the moderate drink

Deal faithfully with all. Scatter truth over the world, however unpalatable it may be to the million. While travelling your unprotected round, you will often meet with sneers and ridicule and contempt. The very name stamped on your forehead, will lead some to abuse you. The truth which you tell will enrage others. Some, in secret, will manifest the most virulent hatred both to you and your message; while, in public, they will be loudest in your praise. Occasionally you will be smiled upon. Sometimes you will be embraced with the most enthusiastic affection. But, notwithstanding all this variety of treatment with which you must meet, go; enter this rude, unfriendly world, fearlessly and alone. And may that God who, with the world of means at his disposal, when the mighty Samson was fatigued and fainting with thirst, refreshed him with a draught of cold water, go with you, and prosper you in assisting to banish from the earth, the ordinary use of ardent spirits.

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III. PROEM.

Perhaps I may be charged with exaggerating the evils of drunkenness, and of the use of ardent spirits. But I am satisfied that the half has not been told. The half never can be told. If the drunkard takes up these pages, he must expect to be handled “without gloves.” Ifhe thinks he will be dissatisfied with rough unceremonious treatment, he had better lay down this little book before he begins to read it. It knows not how to flatter. Should it fall into the hands of him who takes a little, because a little will do him no harm, or because, while in health a little, as he fancies, will do him some good, we tell him beforehand that he will, before he reads it through, dash it on the floor in a rage, unless he becomes a convert to the principles which it advocates. Those who call entire abstinence, temperance, will find at least, a portion of their sentiments, and the evidence in favor of them, briefly stated. They will also find the leading objections against temperance and temperance

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