The Lancashire Witches: A Romance of Pendle Forest, Volume 2

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User Review  - john257hopper - LibraryThing

This is the fifth of the gothic romantic historical novels by Ainsworth that I have read, but is my least favourite. Set largely in the early 17th century under the witch-hunting King James I, it was ... Read full review

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Page 216 - There shall not be found among you any one that maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, or that useth divination, or an observer of times, or an enchanter, or a witch, or a charmer, or a consulter with familiar spirits, or a wizard, or a necromancer. For all that do these things are an abomination unto the Lord : and because of these abominations the Lord thy God doth drive them out from before thee, Thou shalt be perfect with the Lord thy God.
Page 305 - ... drunkenness, and breeds a number of idle and discontented speeches in their ale-houses. For when shall the common people have leave to exercise if not upon the Sundays and Holy Days, seeing they must apply their labour and win their living in all working days...
Page 305 - Whitsun ales, and morris dances, and the setting up of maypoles and other sports therewith used, so as the same be had in due and convenient time, without impediment or neglect of divine service: and that women shall have leave to carry rushes to the church for the decoring of it, according to their old custom.
Page 204 - Carey, states, that he was one morning informed that some people had dug a deep hole in the earth, not far from his own house, and had begun to kindle a fire at the bottom. He immediately proceeded to the spot, and saw a poor leper, who had been deprived of the use of his limbs by the disease, roll himself over and over till, at last, he fell into the pit amidst the flames.
Page 343 - Which these thy subjects have so much desired, Shall be kept holy in their heart's best treasure, And vow'd to JAMES as is this month to Caesar. And now the landlord of this ancient Tower, Thrice fortunate to see this happy hour, Whose trembling heart thy presence sets on fire, Unto this house — the heart of all...
Page 4 - Captaine, affraies no more being at the combat, nor stayes from his purpose for the rummishing shot of a Cannon, nor the small clack of a Pistolet...
Page 268 - James by a great number of Lancashire peasants, tradesmen, and servants, requesting that they might be allowed to take their diversions (as of old accustomed) after divine service on Sundays, is said to have been the origin of the 'Book of Sports,' soon after promulgated by royal authority.
Page 245 - ... threatened instant destruction. The hope was not yet abandoned, that some temporary expedient might be found to bring the rudder again into use, until they should be extricated from this perilous situation. A stage was, therefore, rigged over the stern, for the purpose of examining into its state, but it was found to be so much injured that it was impossible to remedy its defects while in its place, and preparations were forthwith made for unshipping it. In the mean time the position of the vessel...
Page 305 - ... having of May games, Whitsun ales, and morris dances, and the setting up of maypoles and other sports therewith used: so as the same be had in due and convenient time, without impediment or neglect of divine service...

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