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wretchedness and extend the pernicious influence of those, whose minds are thus enlarged, without being sanctified. So likewise the salutary restraints of the most wholesome example, where there is no settled principle to sanction and support-its authority, may be broken by a mere change of situation, or a simple introduction to new associates. And even philosophy, founded on experience and observation, needs the light of Christian faith, and the motives drawn from that futurity which the Gospel unfolds, to give importance to her maxims, and secure, obedience to her precepts. Nothing, indeed, has been found to supply the place, og supersede the necessity, of, the wis: dom from above;" whose light never, fails to guide its followers in the paths of ,

That Christianity, believed, and, regarded, has a tendency, to exalt the character and increase the happiness of mankind, is a doctrine clearly implied in

Then said Jesus to those Jews, which :D:97100101. UV10091 believed on him, if ye continue in my word, then are ye my disciples indeed; and ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.Without repeating the whole context, or giving a disquisition on the metaphorical language, which runs through it, I shall be justified in calling your attention, at once, to the doctrine already stated; and leading you to consider, at large, the influence of Christianity on the character and happiness of mankind.

The subject, thus proposed, will be found appropriate to the occasion; full of instruction and consolation for those, who are offering, their prayers, devoting their substance, employing their time, and exerting their energies, to communicate the knowl

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the heathen, who are afar off-to all the inhabitants of the earth. Let it not be forgotten, however, that the influence of Christianity, to which your attention will be directed, is the influence, which grows out of a firm belief of its doctrines, and a consequent regard to its precepts. The promise of Christ, in our text, is to those, who believe on him and continue in his word. In proportion, therefore, to the conformity of our faith to the pure doctrines of the Gospel, and the fidelity of our obedience to its holy precepts, will be the extent of its influence on our character and happiness. Christianity, in some of its forms, may be so modified, as to lose its beneficent character and sanctifying tendency. And even where its principal truths are admitted in speculation, its genuine spirit may be so completely disregarded, as to pervert its whole design, and render it “a savor of death unto death." But in its purity and simplicity, firmly believed and duly regarded, it always exerts a salutary influence, reaching all minds, adapted to all capacities, bringing "peace and good-will to all men."

1. Let us consider the influence of Christianity on the character and happiness of man, viewed simply as an intellectual being. If we can prove, that Christianity encourages a spirit of free inquiry and philosophical investigation, that it tends to enlarge the sphere of human knowledge and promote intellectual improvement, the inference will follow, that it elevates the character and adds to the happiness of mankind. This must be admitted; or stupidity is a blessing, and unrestrained indulgence of passion a duty. I know, much has been said in praise of ignorance; and even genius, with all her inventions and acquisitions, has been charged with the crime of entailing mischief

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wretchedness and extend the pernicious influence of those, whose minds are thus enlarged, without being sanctified. So likewise the salutary restraints of the most wholesome example, where there is no settled principle to sanction and support-its authority, may be broken by a mere change of situation, or a simple introduction to new associates. And even philosophy, founded on experience and- observation, needs the light of Christian faith, and the motives drawn from that futurity which the Gospel unfolds, to give importance to her maxims, and secure obedience to her precepts. Nothing, indeed, has been found to supply dom, from above;" whose light neyer, fails to guide its followers in the paths of peace and safetysimbol

That Christianity, believed and, regarded, has a tendency to exalt. the character and increase the happiness, of mankind, is a doctrine clearly implied in

Then said Jesus to those Jews, which un bat ori!-1107.199 omota believed on him, if ye continue in my, word, then are ye my disciples indeed; and ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.. Without repeating the whole context, or giving a disquisition on the metaphorical language, which runs through it, I shall be justified in calling your attention, at once, to the doctrine already stated; and leading you to consider, at large, the influence of Christianity on the character and happiness of mankind.

The subject, thus proposed, will be found appropriate to the occasion; full of instruction and consolation for those, who are offering their prayers, devoting their substance, employing their time, and exerting their energies, to communicate the knowledge of this benign religion to their fellow-men-to

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my brethren, to stimulate us to augmented efforts in the cause of missions.

Let us, in this great and godlike enterprize, come forward with a stronger zeal to the help of the Lord against the mighty. Let us labor to embody in our future selves all the moral excellencies of our apostolic missionary. The cause, for the sake of which he resigned so readily all his temporal expectations, to which he was so exclusively devoted, upon which his affections acted in so strong and tender a manner, and in which he so inflexibly persevered, is the same precisely in ours, that it was in his, hands. It is, as it was then, and ever will be, the cause of humanity, of truth, of virtue, of salvation, of God. It embraces all that is valuable to man for time and for eternity. Whoever embarks in this cause, then, must do it with all his heart. He must let his lukewarmness open itself on some temporal concern. Let him be a coward every where else; but let him fight manfully here. Let him be parsimonious in regard to all other demands; but let him be very bountiful here.

We rejoice greatly in the resuscitation, within thirty years past, of the primitive missionary spirit. But, taking the missionary character of Paul for our standard of estimation, we must confess that, after all, this is a day of small things. The Christian Church moves but slowly. The most zealous are as if they were halting between two opinions. Our contributions are as if Mammon had stronger

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