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which new members are admitted and offending members disowned, and individuals, while they continue members of said Society, are guided and governed.

That in the government of this Society, they have a Yearly Meeting, so called from the circumstance of its meeting annually at a stated period, which Yearly Meeting forms the tribunal of the last resort, and presides over and ultimately reviews the proceedings of all the other inferior meetings. That the religious meetings of this Society are established in a due and regular subordination—the Preparative Meetings are subordinate to the Monthly Meetings, the Monthly Meetings to the Quarterly Meetings, and the latter are subordinate to the said Yearly Meeting. The great and primary Yearly Meeting of this religious society in England, where the sect first arose as above mentioned, was instituted and organized as early as the year sixteen hundred and sixty-nine, and it has continued down from that time, and is still in full operation. . And your orator further showeth, that the members of the religious Society of Friends were among the first settlers of this country, and were soon organized here under the same form of government and discipline which had protected and fostered them in England, whence they had emigrated. Their first Yearly Meeting was held at Burlington in New Jersey, the third Firstday of the Sixth-month, June, sixteen hundred and eighty-one, o. s. for the provinces of Pennsylvania and New Jersey; that in sixteen hundred and eighty-five, it was agreed to be held alternately at Burlington and Philadelphia. That in seventeen hundred and fifty-five, the time of holding it was changed to the Ninth-month, September; that in seventeen hundred and sixty, it was concluded to be held at the same time at Philadelphia only; and that in seventeen hundred and ninety-eight, the time of holding it was altered to the third Second-day, or Monday, in the Fourth-month, April, at which time in each and every succeeding year, it has ever since continued to be held, and still is held, at the said city of Philadelphia, commencing yearly on the third Monday of April, at the hour of ten in the forenoon.

And your orator further shows, that there has been for many years past, a Preparation [Preparative] Meeting of the said Society of Friends of Chesterfield, in the said county of Burlington, which holds its meetings at the village of Crosswicks in the said township of Chesterfield, which meeting owns in fee simple, real and personal estate, and among the rest a lot of land in the said village of Crosswicks, on which a Friends' meeting-house has been erected for public worship, all which real and personal estate was held, and still is held, in trust, for the said religious Society of Friends. That the said meeting at Crosswicks is under the control and jurisdiction of the said Yearly Meeting of Philadelphia--that a school for the education of the youth belonging to the said meeting, was established under the control of the said

Preparative Meeting of Chesterfield, the trustees thereof being appointed by the said Preparative Meeting. That in the year seventeen hundred and ninety, a sum of money was raised by voluntary subscription, by different members of the said meeting, which was set apart as a school fund, to be put out at interest on good security, by the treasurer of the said school fund, under the direction of the trustees of said school, chosen and to be chosen by the said Preparative Meeting:-so as best to secure an interest or annuity, the said interest or annuity to be applied to the education of such children as then did or should thereafter belong to the said Preparative Meeting, whose parents were not or should not be of ability to pay for their education; and in case the whole or any part thereof, should not be wanted for such pure pose, then, in that case, the said interest or income, or such parts thereof as should not be so wanted, was to be applied to such other uses of the school or schools then or thereafter to be erected by the said Preparative Meeting, as the trustees or any five of them, should think will best answer the design of the institution.

And your orator further showeth, that in the year eighteen hundred and twenty-one, he was, and still is the treasurer of the said school fund, that on the second day of the Fourth-month, April, eighteen hundred and twenty-one, as such treasurer as aforesaid, he loaned to Thomas L. Shotwell, the sum of two thousand dollars, money of the said school fund, and then held by your orator in trust for the purposes above mentioned, for which he was to give your orator good security; and thereupon the said Thomas L. Shotwell, executed and delivered to your orator a bond, in words or in substance as follows: KNOW ALL Men by these presents, that I, Thomas L. Shotwell, of the township of Chesterfield, county of Burlington, and State of New Jersey, am held and firmly bound unto Joseph Hendrickson, treasurer of the school fund of Crosswicks meeting, and to his successor, in the just and full sum of four thousand dollars, current money of the United States, to be paid to the said Joseph Hendrickson, treasurer as aforesaid, or his successor, or to his certain attorney, executor, administrator, or assigns, to which payment well and truly to be made and done, I bind myself, my heirs, executors, administrators and every of them, firmly by these presents, sealed with my seal. Dated this second day of the Fourthmonth, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-one. 1821.

The condition of this obligation is such, that if the above bounden Thomas L. Shotwell, his heirs, executors or administrators, shall and do well and truly pay or cause to be paid unto the said Joseph Hendrickson, or his successor, certain attorney, executor, administrators, or assigns, the just and full sum of two thousand dollars, money as aforesaid, and that on or before the second day of the Fourth-month next ensuing, with interest at six per cent. for the same, and that without fraud or other delay, then this obligation to be void and of no effect, otherwise to stand and remain in full force and virtue.' And he, the said Thomas L. Shotwell, and Elizabeth his wife, at the same time executed and delivered to your orator a deed of mortgage, in words or in substance as follows, viz. This INDENTURE, made this second day of the Fourth-month, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-one, between Thomas L. Shotwell, of the township of Chesterfield, in the county of Burlington, and State of New Jersey, and Elizabeth his wife, party of the first part, Joseph Hendrickson, treasurer of the school fund of Crosswicks meeting, and to his successors, party of the second part, witnesseth that the said party of the first part, in consideration of the debt or sum hereinafter mentioned to be secured, and of the further sum of one dollar to them in hand paid by the said party of the second part, before the sealing and delivery hereof, the receipt whereof the said party of the first part, do hereby acknowledge, have granted, bargained, sold, enfeoffed, released and confirmed, and by these presents do grant, bargain, sell, alien, enfeoff, release and confirm unto the said party of the second part, his heirs and assigns, all that messuage, house and farm, containing fifty-six acres and fifty-five hundredths, more or less, situate in the township of Chesterfield, and county of Burlington aforesaid, which I purchased of Robert Field and Hannah his wife, by deed bearing date the twenty-eighth day of the Sixthmonth, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventeen, and is bounded as follows: Beginning at a stone in the road leading from Bordentown to Crosswicks, and is a corner of Samuel Bunting's land, and runs (1) south forty degrees, east thirteen chains and twenty links, (2) south sixty-two degrees and thirty minutes, west nine chains and thirty links, (3) north thirtyeight degrees and forty-five minutes, west nine chains and thirty links, (4) north sixty-two degrees and thirty minutes, east twenty chains and eighty-three links, (5) north twenty-five degrees and forty-five minutes, west four chains and forty-two links, (6) north one degree, east ten chains and ninety links, (7) north eighty-six degrees, east twenty-seven chains and fifty links, (8) south eight degrees, west five chains and twenty-eight links, (9) north eightythree degrees and fifteen minutes, west fifteen chains and seventy links. Together with all and singular the appurtenances and the reversions, remainders, rents, issues, and profits thereof. And all the estate, right, title, interest, use, possession, property, claim and demand of them the said party of the first part, of, in, and to the same, to have and to hold the premises hereby granted, with all and singular the appurtenances unto him the said party of the second part, his heirs and assigns for ever. Provided always nevertheless, and it is the true intent and meaning of these presents, that if the said Thomas L. Shotwell; one of the party aforesaid of the first part, his heirs, executors, or administrators do and shall well and truly pay unto the said Joseph Hendrickson, or his successor, treasurer of the school fund, party of the second part, his executors, administrators, or assigns, the sum of two thousand dollars, with interest thereon at six per cent. in one year from the date hereof, as contained in the condition of a bond, bearing even date herewith, from the said Thomas L. Shotwell to the said Joseph Hendrickson, (and his successor) as treasurer of the school fund of Crosswicks meeting aforesaid, in the penal sum of four thousand dollars, as by reference to the same will appear: then and from thenceforth, as well the said obligation, as also these presents, and every thing herein contained, shall cease and become null and void, any thing herein contained to the contrary in any wise notwithstanding, but on failure thereof to be and remain in full force. In witness whereof, the said Thomas L. Shotwell and Elizabeth his wife, have to these presents set their hands and seals, the day and year first above written. Which said mortgage was, by the said Thomas L. Shotwell and Elizabeth his wife, acknowledged in due form, on the day of its date, before Thomas Talman, Esquire, and so as to pass her separate interest therein, all which, by the said bond and mortgage and the certificates endorsed thereon, reference being thereunto had, will fully appear.

And your orator further shows, that the interest accruing upon the said mortgage, has been duly paid by the said Thomas L. Shotwell to your orator, up to the spring of eighteen hundred and twenty-seven, and the same when paid has been appropriated by your orator to and for the purposes of the said trust, but all the principal, and the remaining interest, is still in arrear and unpaid.

Under these circumstances, your orator well hoped that the said Thomas L. Shotwell would have paid to your orator the arrears due upon the said mortgage, as your orator in a friendly manner has often requested him to do, and as in equity and good conscience he ought to have done.

But now so it is, may it please your Excellency, the said Thomas L. Shotwell and Elizabeth his wife, combining and confederating with others, to your orator unknown, whose names when discovered, he prays may be inserted herein, with apt words to charge them as parties defendants hereto, contriving how to aggrieve and injure your orator in the premises; they sometimes pretend that your orator is not entitled to recover the moneys due and in arrear on said bond and mortgage, and he the said Thomas refuses to pay the same to your orator, being such treasurer as aforesaid, which pretensions are altogether unfounded and erroneous, and ought not to prevail against the claims of your orator.

And in order more fully to expose and confute the unfounded pretensions of the said Thomas L. Shotwell and his confederates, your orator further shows, and charges that there has been for

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several years past a dispute and controversy in the Society of Friends, which divided them into two parties, the one generally called and known by the name of the Hicksites, the other by the name of the Orthodox party; the Hicksite party derived their name from Elias Hicks, who is their leader, and first broached among them, the peculiar doctrines and tenets by which that party is distinguished. The said Hicksite party and Orthodox party, differ essentially from each other in religious doctrine; and the Hicksite party have materially departed, as hereinafter shown, from the regular discipline and government of the Society of Friends.

And your orator further charges and shows, that the following religious doctrines have always been held and maintained by the Society of Friends, or people commonly called Quakers.

In the first place, although the Society of Friends have seldom made use of the word Trinity, yet they believe in the existence of the Father, the Son, or word, and the Holy Spirit. That the Son was God and became flesh; that there is one God and Father of whom are all things; that there is one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom all things were made, who was glorified with the Father before the world began, who is God over all, blessed, for ever; that there is one Holy Spirit the promise of the Father and the Son, and leader, and sanctifier, and comforter of his people, and that these three are one, the Father, the Word, and the Spirit.

That the principal difference between the people called Quakers, and other protestant trinitarian sects in regard to the doctrine of the trinity, is that the latter attach the idea of individual personage to the three, as what they consider a fair logical inference from the doctrines expressly laid down in the Holy Scriptures. The people called Quakers, on the other hand, considering it a mystery beyond finite, human conception, take up the doctrine as expressly laid down in the Scripture, and have not considered themselves warranted in making deductions however specious.

In the second place, the people called Quakers have always believed in the doctrine of the atonement; that the divine and human nature of Jesus Christ the Saviour were united; that thus united, he suffered, and that through his sufferings, death and resurrection, he atoned for the sins of men.

That the Son of God, in the fulness of time took flesh, became perfect man, according to the flesh, descended and came of the seed of Abraham and Dayid, that being with God from all eternity, being himself God, and also in time partaking of the nature of man, through him is the goodness and love of God conveyed to mankind, and that by him again man receiveth and partaketh of these mercies. That Christ took upon him the seed of Abraham, and his holy body and blood was an offering and a sacrifice for the sins of the whole world.

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