Ainsworth's Magazine: A Miscellany of Romance, General Literature, & Art, Volume 22

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William Harrison Ainsworth
Chapman and Hall, 1852 - Popular literature

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Contents

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Page 482 - ALMIGHTY God, with whom do live the spirits of them that depart hence in the Lord, and with whom the souls of the faithful, after they are delivered from the burden of the flesh, are in joy and felicity...
Page 2 - There shall not be found among you any one that maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, or that useth divination, or an observer of times, or an enchanter, or a witch, or a charmer, or a consulter with familiar spirits, or a wizard, or a necromancer. For all that do these things are an abomination unto the Lord : and because of these abominations the Lord thy God doth drive them out from before thee, Thou shalt be perfect with the Lord thy God.
Page 524 - Or to burst all links of habit — there to wander far away, On from island unto island at the gateways of the day.
Page 304 - Lord, with them that strive with me, and fight thou against them that fight against me. 2 Lay hand upon the shield and buckler, and stand up to help me. 3 Bring forth the spear, and stop the way against them that persecute me : say unto my soul, I am thy salvation.
Page 381 - For thee, my own sweet sister, in thy heart I know myself secure, as thou in mine ; We were and are — I am, even as thou art — Beings who ne'er each other can resign ; It is the same, together or apart, From life's commencement to its slow decline We are entwined — let death come slow or fast, The tie which bound the first, endures the last ! LINES ON HEARING THAT LADY BYRON WAS ILL.
Page 482 - MAN, that is born of a woman, hath but a short time to live, and is full of misery. He cometh up, and is cut down like a flower ; he fleeth as it were a shadow, and never continueth in one stay.
Page 376 - Whitsun ales, and morris dances, and the setting up of maypoles and other sports therewith used, so as the same be had in due and convenient time, without impediment or neglect of divine service: and that women shall have leave to carry rushes to the church for the decoring of it, according to their old custom.
Page 316 - Let it be impressed upon your minds, let it be instilled into your children, that the liberty of the press is the palladium of all the civil, political, and religious rights of an Englishman...
Page 404 - I had great beauty : ask thou not my name : No one can be more wise than destiny. Many drew swords and died. Where'er I came I brought calamity.
Page 229 - The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils ; The motions of his spirit are dull as night, And his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted.

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