The Wigwam and the Cabin. First Series

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Page 79 - ... less than we made. We didn't have very nice food, but we had no physic to take, and no doctor's bills to pay. We had a great deal to make us happy, and still more to be thankful for; and I trust in God we were thankful for all of his blessings. I think we were, for he gave us other blessings; and for these, stranger, we are trying to be thankful also. " Well, as I was saying, about twelve years ago, one hot day in August, I rode out a little piece towards the river bluff to see if any goods had...
Page 3 - Ninety-six" district. Old Grayling, the head of the family, was dead. He was killed in Buford's massacre. His wife was a fine woman, not so very old, who had an only son named James, and a little girl, only five years of age, named Lucy. James was but fourteen when his father was killed, and that event made a man of him. He went out with his rifle in company with Joel Sparkman, who was his mother's brother, and joined himself to Pickens
Page 181 - ... is due only to the mode of life and pursuits in which they are engaged. Their beastly intoxication will offend his tastes — their superstition and ignorance — the circumscribed limits of their capacity for judging of things and relations beyond the life of the bird or beast of prey — will awaken in him a sense of shame when he feels that they are his kindred. The insecurity of their liberties will awaken his fears, for he will instantly see that the great body of the people in every aboriginal...
Page 8 - Well, Mr. Macnab, I see that my sister's got supper ready for us ; so we mou't as well fall to upon the hoecake and bacon." Sparkman rose while speaking, and led the way to the spot, near the wagon, where Mrs. Grayling had spread the feast. " We're pretty nigh on to the main road, here, but I reckon there's no great danger now. Besides, Jim Grayling keeps watch for us, and he's got two as good eyes in his head as any scout in the country, and a rifle that, after you once know how it shoots, 'twould...
Page 2 - ... the errors of preceding ages. A love of the marvellous belongs, it appears to me, to all those who love and cultivate either of the fine arts. I very much doubt whether the poet, the painter, the sculptor, or the romancer, ever yet lived, who had not some strong bias— a leaning, at least,— to a belief in the wonders of the invisible world. Certainly, the higher orders of poets and painters, those who create and invent, must have a strong taint of the superstitious in their composition.
Page 5 - What of that, mother! we can't turn the stranger off and say 'no;' and if he means any mischief, there's two of us, you know." The man had no weapons— none, at least, which were then visible; and deported himself in so humble a manner, that the prejudice which the party had formed against him when he first appeared, if it was not dissipated while he remained, at least failed to gain any increase. He was very quiet, did not mention an unnecessary word, and seldom permitted his eyes to rest upon...
Page 15 - I liked that fellow's looks, nay, had I not positively disliked them, I should have gone with him. As it is, I will remain and share your breakfast." The repast being over, all parties set forward ; but Spencer, after keeping along with them for a mile, took his leave also. The slow...
Page 10 - He also fou't at Ninety-Six, and Cowpens — so I reckon we had as good as count him one of us." Major Spencer scrutinized the Scotchman keenly — a scrutiny which the latter seemed very ill to relish. He put a few questions to him on the subject of the war, and some of the actions in which he allowed himself to have been concerned ; but his evident reluctance to unfold himself — a reluctance so unnatural to the brave soldier who has...
Page 179 - ... persevere in pressing war upon those sturdy adventurers, and their doom is written. I fear it may be the sword ; I hope it may be the milder fate of bondage and subjection. Such a fate would save, and raise them finally to a far higher condition than they have ever before enjoyed. Thirty thousand Texans, each with his horse and rifle, would soon make themselves masters of the city of Montezuma, and then may you see the experiment tried upon a scale sufficiently extensive to make it a fair one....
Page 1 - ... of credulity. That cold-blooded demon called Science has taken the place of all the other demons. He has certainly cast out innumerable devils, however he may still spare the principal. Whether we are the better for his intervention is another question. There is reason to apprehend that in disturbing our human faith in shadows, we have lost some of those wholesome moral restraints which might have kept many of us virtuous, where the laws could not.

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