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I desire here to acknowledge with gratitude my indebtedness to Mr. J. T. Tomlinson, who has, with the greatest kindness, given time and labour to revising the proof sheets, and verifying quotations and authoritics.

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The Protestant Church of England and the anti-Protestant

reaction.

CHAPTER 1.-A PRELIMINARY ARGUMENT

I

The age in which the Prayer Book was compiled, the men

who compiled it, and the influences moulding them.

CHAPTER II.—THREE GENERAL PROTESTANT CHARACTER-

ISTICS

22

...

...

It is Common Prayer; it is in the language of the people ;

it is scriptural.

CHAPTER III.--MORNING AND EVENING PRAYER AND LITANY

34

The Protestant features of the Prayers and Rubrics; the

noteworthy changes in the Litany.

CHAPTER IV.-THE COMMUNION SERVICE

46

Not the Mass, nor the semi-Protestant service of 1549.

The Sarum Mass; Pusey's Views.

CHAPTER V.-THE BAPTISMAL OFFICE ...

66

Not Romish; not superstitious. The Roman doctrine of

Baptismal Regeneration not taught in the Church of
England.

...

93

CHAPTER VI.---THE OCCASIONAL SERVICES
Significant changes in the direction of Protestantism in

all these services

PREFACE.

THE
HE volume entitled " The Protestantism of

the Prayer Book," originally published in Canada, requires no recommendation from me. It can afford to stand on its own feet, and to be judged by its own merits. Nevertheless, having been requested by the author to add a few prefatory words to the edition about to be published in England, I have much pleasure in complying with his request.

The volume now in the reader's hands is a brief but exhaustive account of the true principles on which the English Book of Common Prayer was finally compiled, when the Reformation of our Church was completed, and the Second Book of King Edward substituted for the First Book. Those principles were carefully retained in the Prayer Book of Queen Elizabeth's reign and were finally preserved unaltered in the last revision of 1661. Even at that date, immediately after the unhappy Savoy Conference, Archbishop Sheldon and his assistant revisers did not attempt to bring back into our Liturgy the questionable things which found a place in King Edward's First Prayer Book, and

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