Essays, Selected from Contributions to the Edinburgh Review ...

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Page 14 - Sometimes it lieth in pat allusion to a known story, or in seasonable application of a trivial saying, or in forging an apposite tale : sometimes it playeth in words and phrases, taking advantage from the ambiguity of their sense, or the affinity of their sound.
Page 233 - A man so various, that he seem'd to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome...
Page 42 - A quibble is the golden apple for which he will always turn aside from his career or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight that he was content to purchase it by the sacrifice of reason, propriety, and truth. A quibble was to him the fatal Cleopatra for which he lost the world, and was content to lose it.
Page 95 - Holland, that scarce deserves the name of land, As but the off-scouring of the British sand ; And so much earth as was contributed By English pilots when they heav'd the lead ; Or what by th
Page 89 - O Printing! how hast thou disturbed the peace of mankind! That lead, when moulded into bullets, is not so mortal, as when founded into letters. There was a mistake, sure, in the story of Cadmus; and the serpent's teeth, which he sowed, were nothing else but the letters which he invented.
Page 7 - A PISGAH SIGHT OF PALESTINE, AND THE CONFINES THEREOF; WITH THE HISTORY OF THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT ACTED THEREON.
Page 289 - Then they essayed to look, but the remembrance of that last thing that the Shepherds had shown them, made their hands shake; by means of which impediment, they could not look steadily through the glass; yet they thought they saw something like the gate, and also some of the glory of the place.
Page 488 - Were all books reduced thus to their quintessence, many a bulky author would make his appearance in a penny paper : there would be scarce such a thing in nature as a folio : the works of an age would be contained on a few shelves ; not to mention millions of volumes that would be utterly annihilated.
Page 431 - For I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which all your adversaries shall not be able to gainsay nor resist.
Page 18 - Philosophers place it in the rear of the head, and it seems the mine of memory lies there, because there men naturally dig for it, scratching it when they are at a loss.

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