Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes and Adventures of the War

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E.B. Treat & Company, 1867 - American literature - 601 pages
This is a book of "personal portraits, scenes and adventures of the War." It includes illustrations.

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Page 109 - While my own confidence in your ability, zeal, and devotion to the cause is unimpaired, I have nevertheless felt that I could not oppose what seems to be the current of opinion without injustice to your reputation and injury to the service. I therefore felt constrained to endeavour to find a commander who would be more likely to develop the strength and resources of the country, and inspire the soldiers with confidence...
Page 80 - Ashby bore to my command, for most of the previous twelve months, will justify me in saying that, as a partisan officer, I never knew his superior. His daring was proverbial, his powers of endurance almost incredible, his tone of character heroic, and his sagacity almost intuitive in divining the purposes and movements of the enemy.
Page 385 - He's in the saddle now. Fall in, Steady the whole brigade! Hill's at the ford, cut off; we'll win His way out, ball and blade. What matter if our shoes are worn? What matter if our feet are torn? Quick step! We're with him before morn—-. That's Stonewall Jackson's way.
Page 139 - PELHAM,' his many virtues, his noble nature and purity of character, is enshrined as a sacred legacy in the hearts of all who knew him. His record has been bright and spotless; his career brilliant and successful. He fell — the noblest of sacrifices — on the altar of his country, to whose glorious service he had dedicated his life from the beginning of the war.
Page 110 - I am sure that you will understand and appreciate my motives, and no one will be more ready than yourself to acquiesce in any measures which the interests of the country may seem to require, regardless of all personal considerations. Thanking you for the fidelity and energy with which you have always supported my efforts, and for the courage and devotion you Lave ever manifested in the service of the country, I am, very respectfully and truly, Your obedient servant, RE LEE, General.
Page 128 - The noble, the chivalric, the gallant Pelham is no more. He was killed in action yesterday. His remains will be sent to you to-day. How much he was beloved, appreciated, and admired, let the tears of agony we have shed, and the gloom of mourning throughout my command, bear witness. His loss is irreparable.
Page 309 - Order AP Hill to prepare for action ! pass the infantry to the front rapidly ! tell Major Hawks " — then stopped, leaving the sentence unfinished.
Page 385 - Stonewall Jackson's way. Ah! maiden, wait and watch and yearn For news of Stonewall's band. Ah! widow, read with eyes that burn That ring upon thy hand. Ah! wife, sew' on, pray on, hope on; Thy life shall not be all forlorn; The foe had better ne'er been born That gets in Stonewall's way.
Page 78 - I was with him," says Colonel Johnson, " when the first blow was struck for the cause which we both had so much at heart ; and was with him in his last fight, always knowing him to be beyond all modern men in chivalry, as he was equal to any one in courage. He combined the virtues of Sir Philip Sidney with the dash of Murat. I contribute my mite to his fame, which will live in the Valley of Virginia, outside of books, as long as its hills and mountains shall endure.
Page 109 - Department necessary; but it is due to your zealous and patriotic services that I should explain the reasons that prompted my action. The situation of affairs is such that we can neglect no means calculated to develop the resources we possess to the greatest extent, and make them as efficient as possible. To this end, it is essential that we should have the cheerful and hearty support of the people, and the full confidence of the soldiers, without which onr efforts would be embarrassed and our means...

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