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ures with the 1. 1: 2.-love of valour government has none to fear, 3. 2:5.
may subserve the good of the, 1. 2: benevolence the only security of a, 4.
3.-the disposal of kingdoms rests 1:7.-a vicious, the agent of his own
with the, 1. 2: 10.--the affections of, ruin, 6. 1: 8.-importance of rectify-
only secured by benevolent govern- ing a, 4. 1:20.-presents of a, to a
ment, 1. 2: 12.; 4. 1: 9.—'s happi- scholar, how to be made and accepted,
ness disregarded by the ministers of 5. 2:6.-three precious things of a
Mencius' time, 4. 1: 14.-the part of 7. 2: 28.
the, in making an emperor, 6. 1:5. Princes, the only topics of Mencius
-how to promote the virtue of the, with, 1. 1:1.-a chieftain of the, not
7. 1: 23.—the most important ele a sovereign of the empire, 2. 1: 3.-
ment in a nation, 7. 2:14.

the, of Mencius' time failing in true
Pecuniary considerations, Mencius not royal governmelt, 2. 1:5.- Mencius
influenced by, 2. 2: 10.

declining or accepting gifts of, 2. 2:
Personal character, importance of, 4. 3.; 5. 2: 4.-Mencius, reserve with
1:5.

the, of his time, 3. 2: 1.-Mencius
Pictures of Pih-e and Hwuy of Lew defends himself for not going to see
hea, 2. 1:9.

the, 3: 2:7.-why a scholar should
Phenomena, importance of carefully decline going to see, when called by
studying, 4. 2: 26.

them. 5. 2:7.-danger of counselling
Pleasure, rulers must share with the from the ground of profit, 6. 2: 4. -
people, 1, 1:2,; 2: 1,4.

influence of a chief among the, dif-
Position, how one's material, affects his ferent from that of a true sovereign,
air, 7. 1:36.

7. 1: 13.—of his time, Mencius cen-
Poverty, when office may be taken on sures the, 7. 1: 46.- how Mencius

account of, 5. 2:5.-importance of maintained his own dignity with the,
not allowing the mind to be injured 7. 2:33.
by, 7. 1:27.-equanimity of Shun in, Principles, one must live or die with
7. 2:6.

his, &c., 7. 1: 42.
Praise and blame not always according Profit, secondary to benevolence and
to desert, 4. 1: 21.

righteousness, 1. 1:1.; 6. 2: 4.
Precious things, three, of a prince, 7. Progress of degeneracy in successive
2:28.

ages, 6. 2: 7.
Precipitate advances will be followed Prompt action, necessity of, at the right
by speedy retreats, 7. 1. 44.

time, 4. 2: 4.
Prediction of P'un-shing Kwoh’s death Propriety, belongs naturally to man, 2.
by Mencius, 7. 2: 29.

1:6.-parents should be served, &c.,
Prepares himself for the duties to according to, 3. 1: 2.-help to the

which he aspires, how a scholar, 7. world should be given according to,
1:33.

4. 1:17.--the richest fruit of, 4. 1:
Presents, Mencius defends accepting, 27.--the great man makes no mis-

from oppressors of the people 5. 2: takes in, 4. 2: 6.—the superior man
4.-of a prince to a scholar, how to preserves, 4. 2: 28.-importance of
be made, and accepted, 5. 2:6.-how observing the rules of, 6. 2:1.

Mencius acknowledged, 7. 2:5. Prosperity of a country, on what de-
Presumptuous idea of Pih Kwei, that pendent, 1. 1: 1.

he could regulate the waters better Pupil of the eye, the index of the heart,
than Yu did, 6. 2: 11.

4. 1: 15.
Prince, a, should employ ministers, how, Purity, pretended, of Ch'in Chung, 3.

1. 2: 7.-should depend on himself, 2: 10.
not on other powers, 1. 2: 13.-threat- Re ord, quotation from a, 3. 2: 3.
ened by neighbours should act how, Remote, against aiming at what is, 7.2:
1. 2: 14.-two courses open to, when 32.
pursued by his enemies, 1. 2: 15.- Repelling officiousness, Mencius,2.2:11.
should get the hearts of men, 2. 2: Reproof, the benefit of, 4. 1: 22.-Men-
1.-slighting Mencius, 2. 2: 2.—the, cius' of Yo-ching, 4. 1:24, 25.-of
who sets about practising benevolent' Kung-sun Ch'ow, 7. 1:39.

Reputation, the value of, to a ruler, 7. rior to all other, 5. 2: 1.—the great 1:14.

doctrines of the, to be advanced to, Reserve, Mencius defends his, with the by successive steps, 7. 1: 24.--Pih-e, princes of his time, 3. 2:1.

&c., proved to be, by the permanence Respected, that a scholar be, is essen- of their influence, 7. 2: 15.-defini

tial to his engaging in a prince's ser- tion of a, 7. 2: 23.—the perfect virvice, 7. 1: 37.

tue of the highest, 7. 2: 33. Riches, not to be elated by, a proof of Satisfied, how an adviser of the princes superiority, 7. 1: 11.

may always be perfectly, 7. 1:9. Righteousness belongs naturally to man, Scholar(s), the, ought to be remuner

2. 1:6.; 6. 1: 1.-the straight path, ated, 3. 2: 4.-may accept presents 4. 1: 10.- fraternal obedience the from a prince, on what principles, 5. richest fruit of, 4. 1: 27.-the great! 2: 6.-should decline going to see the man makes no mistakes in, 4. 2: 6.- princes when called by them, why, 5, internal, not external, 6. 1: 4,5.-to 2: 7:-forming friendships, rules for,

be loved more than life, 6. 1:10. 5. 2: 8.-ancient, maintained the digRipe grain, illustration from, 6. 1: 19. nity of their character, &c., how, 7. Ritual Usages, quotation from the, 3. 1:8.-prepares himself for the duties 2:2.

to which he aspires, 7.1: 33.-must Royal government, the great principles be respected in order to his engaging

of, 1. 1:3, 4.-will assuredly raise to in the service of a prince, 7. 1:33. the imperial dignity, 1.2:6.-various Self, the charge of, greatest, 4. 1: 19. points of, neglected in Mencius time, Self-cultivation, men's disregard of, 6. 2. 1: 5.

1:13. Ruin, a vicious prince the agent of his Self-examination recommended, 4. 1: own, 4. 1:8.

4.--the superior man practises, 4. 2: Rulers, should share their pleasures 28.

with the people, 1. 1: 2.-should fol- Self-restraint necessary to a ruler, 1. 2: low the advice of the wise, 1. 2:9.- 4. should sympathize with the people in Selling himself, Pih-le He vindicated their joys and sorrows, 1. 2: 4.- from the charge of, 5. 1: 9. should not labour at husbandry with Senses, all men have the same, 6. 1:7. their own hands, 3. 1: 4. - shoula -some are the slaves of the, 6. 1:15. study the example and principles of Settling the empire, 1. 1: 6. the ancient kings, 4. 1:1, 2.-impor-Shame, the value of the feeling of, 7. tance of benevolence to, 4. 1:3.-'s 1:6, 7. example, influence of, 4. 2:5.-will Sheep-dates, Tsang-tsze could not eat, not be murmured at when their aim 7. 2:36. is evidently the people's good, 7. 1: Shifts, Mencius put to. 2. 2: 2. 12.-the value of reputation and mor-Shoo-king, quotations from the, 1. 1:2.; al influences to, 7. 1: 14.

2:3, 11.; 2. 1: 4.; 3. 1:1.; 2:5, 9.; Rules, the necessity of governing ac- 4. 1:8.; 5. 1: 5.; 6. 2:5.-with what cording to, 4. 1:1, 2.

reservation Mencius read the, 7. 2: 3. Sacrifice, allusions to, 3. 1:2.; 2: 3, 5.; Sickuess, Mencius pretends, 2. 2: 2.

4. 2: 25, 33.; 6. 2:6.; 7. 2: 14. Sincerity, the great work of men should Sage, Mencius not a, 2. 1:2.-only with be to strive after perfect, 4. 1:12.

a, does the body act according to Slaves of sense, how some are, 6. 1: 15. its design, 7. 1:37.—the lessons of Sorrow of Shun on account of his pathe, reach to all classes, 7. 1:40.

rents, 5. 1:1. Sages, when they arise, will agree with Sovereign, killing a, not necessarily

Mencius, 3. 2: 9.--the human rela- murder, 1. 2:8.-of the empire, who tions perfectly exhibited by, 4. 1:2. is a, 2. 1:3.-importance of having -the agreement of, not affected by virtuous men about a, 3. 2:6.-'s place or time, 4. 2: 1-are distin- example, influence of, 4. 2:5.-influguished from other men, how, 4. 2:2, ence of a true, 7. 1:13.-a, the least 19, 20, 21, 22.-just like other men, important element of a nation, 7. 2: 4. 2: 32.; 6. 1:7.-Confucius supeol 14.

Sovereigns, will be treated by their Superiority, not to be elated by riches,

ministers according as they treat a proof of, 7. 1:11. them, 4. 2: 2.--the ministers of Men-Talents, and virtue, how to know men

cius' time pandered to their, 6. 2: 9. of, 1. 2: 7.-a ruler should be guided Spirit-man, who is a, 7. 2: 25.

by men of, 1. 2:9.-duties owing by Spirits, tutelary, the importance of to men of, to those who have not, 4. 2: a nation, 7. 2: 14.

7. 'Spring-and-Autumn,' referred to, 3. 2: Taxation, 3. 1:3.; 2:8.; 6. 2: 10. 9.; 4. 2:21.; 7. 2: 2.

Teacher a, in a higher place than a minState, three things important in the ad- ister, 4. 2: 31.-of truth, must not ministration of a, 7. 2: 12.

lower his lessons to suit learners, 7. States, intercourse of neighbouring, 1. 1:41.

2:3.-rise and fall of, dependent on Teaching, refusing to teach, may also benevolence, 4. 1: 3.-subjection of, be a way of, 6. 2: 16. to one another, determined different- Territory, emoluments regulated acly at different times, 4. 1: 7.

cording to the extent of, in a State, Straits, why Confucius was reduced to, 5. 2: 2. 7. 2: 18.

Thought, how many act without, 7. 1: Subjection of one State to another, how 5.

determined, at different times, 4. 1:7. Three, things universally acknowledged Successive steps, the doctrines of the to be honourable, 2. 2: 2.-kings, the,

sages to be advanced to by, 7. 1: 24. 6. 2: 7.-things in which the supeSuperior man, the, keeps away from his rior man delights, 7. 1: 20.-things

cook-room, 1. 1: 7.-helps men to important in the administration of a practice virtue, 2. 1: 8.—will not fol State, 7. 2: 12.-precious things of a low narrow-mindedness, &c., 2. 1:9. prince, 7. 2: 28. - will not take a bribe, 2. 2: 3.-Will Throne, the, descended to Yu's son, not be niggardly to his parents, 2. 2: and not to his minister, why, 5. 1:6. 7.-of ancient and of modern times Thumb amongst the fingers, Ch'in contrasted, 2. 2: 9.-does not mur Chung compared to the, 3. 2: 10. mur against Heaven, &c., 2. 2: 13.- Topics of Mencius with princes, 1. 1: makes difficulty about taking office, 1, 7.; 2: 2: 2. why, 3. 2:3.—the spirit nourished by, Touch, males and females must not almay be known, how, 3. 2: 7.-does low their hands to, 4. 1:17. not himself teach his son, why, 4. 1: Tours of inspection of the ancient 18.-wishes to get hold of what he kings, 1. 2: 4.; 6. 2: 7. learns, as in himself, 4. 2: 14, 15.-is Tranquillity of the empire dependent ashamed of a reputation beyond his on the discharge of the common dumerits, 4. 2:18.-cultivates moral ex ties of life, 4. 1:11. cellence, &c., 4. 2: 28.-may be de- Transmission of doctrine from Yaou to cieved, in what respects, 5. 1: 2.--all Mencius, 7. 2: 38 do not understand the conduct of, 6. Trials and hardships, how Heaven pre2: 6.-serves his prince, how, 6. 2: 8. pares men by, 6. 2: 15. -taking and leaving office, grounds Trifles, Mencius censures the princes of, 6. 2: 14. — has three things in of his time for occupying themselves which he delights, 7. 1: 20.-finds with, 7. 1: 46. his true enjoyment in his own nature, Trouble and afliction, the benefits of, 7. 1: 21. 's services to a country, _ 7. 1: 18. without his being in office, entitle Truth, how Mencius required the simhim to support, 7. 1: 32.—is kind to ple pursuit of, in his pupils, 7. 1:42. creatures, loving to men, and affec-Tyrant, what will be the fate of a, 4. tionate to his relatives, 7. 1:45. 1:2. speaks of his nature, and of the will Ulcer-doctor, Confucius charged with of Heaven, how, 6. 2: 24.-the words lodging with an, 5. 1: 8.

and the principles of, 7. 2: 32. Unfilial, tive things which are, 4. 2: 30. Sympathy of a ruler with the people in Unperturbed mind, Mencius' had attheir joys and sorrows, 1. 2: 4. tained to an, 2. 1: 2.

Unsalaried, Mencius free to speak his Warning to the violently evil and the

opinion, &c., because, 2. 2: 5, 14. weakly evil, 4. 1:10.-to Sung Kang,
Unworthy associate, Mencius' behav- 6. 2:4.-to the contending States of
iour with an, 2. 2: 6.

Mencius' time, 7. 2: 2.
Valour, the love of, 1. 2: 3.-how nour-Wars, all the, in the Ch'an Tsewwere un-
ished, 2. 1:2.

righteous, 7. 2: 2.-counsels against,
Villages, the good careful people of the, 7.2: 4.
described, 6. 2:37.

Way, a man's in life, ordered by Heaven,
Vindication of E Yin, 5. 1:7.-of Con-

1. 2:16.-of truth like a great road,
fucius from the charge of lodging. 6. 2: 2.
with unworthy characters, 5. 1:8. - Wealth, the love of, compatible with
of Pih-le He, 5. 1: 9.-of Mencius royal government, 1. 2: 6.-disgrace-
from the charge of eating the bread

sul means which men take to seek, 4.
of idleness, 7. 1: 32.

2: 32.—and power, the ministers of
Virtue, submission secured by, 2. 1: 3.

Mencius' time pandered to their sov-
---friendship must have reference to

ereign' thirst for, 6. 2: 9.
the, of the friend, 5. 2:3.—is sure to

Well-being of the people, the first care
be gained by seeking it, but external

of a government, in order to their

virtue, 7. 1: 23.
things not, 7. 1:3.-man may attain
to perfect, 7. 1: 4:-of the people, Will, the, is the leader of the passion-

Well, digging a, 7. 1: 29.
how to promote, 7. 1: 42..corrupt nature, 2. 1: 2.
times are provided against by estab- Willow, man's nature compared to the
lished, 7. 2: 10.-of the highest sages,
7. 2: 33.

ke, 6. 1:1.

Wisdom the richest fruit of, 4. 1:17.
Virtues, where are wanting, decencies
may not be expected, 7. 2: 44.

Words, Mencius understood, 2. 1:2.-
Virtuous men, importance of having,

what are most truly inauspicious, 4.

2:17.
about a sovereign's person, 3. 2: 6.

World, one cannot avoid all connection
Vox populi vox Dei, 5. 1:5.

with those whom he disapproves, in
Warlike and other schemes of the min- the, 3. 2:10.

isters of his time condemned by Men-Wrongs should be put right at once, 3
cius, 4. 2: 14.; 6. 2: 8.

2:8.

INDEX II.

PROPER NAMES IN WORKS OF MENCIUS.

Chang E, a celebrated scholar of Wei, Ch'in Chung, an ascetic of Ts'e, 3. 2:
3. 2: 2.

10.; 7. 1:34.
Chang, Kwang Chang, a minister of Ch'in Kea, an officer of Ts'e, 2. 2: 9.
Ts'e, 4. 2: 30.

Ch'in Leang, a philosopher, 3. 1: 4.
Ch‘ang Seih, a disciple of Kung-ming Ch'in Seang, a disciple of Ch'in Leang,
Kaou, 5. 1:1.; 2: 3.

3. 1: 4.
Chaou Keen, a noble of Tsin, 3. 2:1. Ch'in Tae, a disciple of Mencius, 3. 2:1.
Chaou the great, a title borne by differ- Ch‘in Tsin, a disciple of Mencius, 2. 2:

ent ministers of Tsin, 6. 1:17. 3, 10.; 6. 2: 14.; 7. 2: 23.
Chaou-woo, a hill on the north of Ts'e, Ch'in, the State of, 5. 1: 8.; 7. 2:18,
1. 2: 4.

27.
Che-shaou the name of a piece of mu- Ch'ing the State of, 4. 2:2, 24.; 5. 1:
sic, 1. 2:4.

2.; 7. 2:37.
Ch'e Wa, appointed chief criminal Ch'ing, a minister of the State of Ch'in,
judge of Tsée, 2. 2:5.

5. 1: 8.
Chih, a famous robber of Confucius' Choo, a minister of Ts'e, 4. 2: 32.; 6.
time, 3. 2: 10.; 7. 1: 25.

2:5.

Choo-fung, the birth place of Shun, 4.Hae T'ang, a famous worthy of Tsio, 2:1.

5. 2: 3. Chow, the State and dynasty, 1. 2:3.; Han, one of the three families which

2. 1:1.; 2: 13.; 3. 1:3.; 2:5.; 4. 1: governed the State of Tsin, 7. 1:11.

7.; 2: 1.; 5. 1:4, 6.; 2: 2, 4, 7. Han, the name of a stream, 3. 1:4. Chow, a city on the southern border of Haou-sang Puh-hae, a man of Tse, 7. Ts'e, 2. 2: 11, 12.

2: 25. Chow, the last emperor of the Yin dy-He, a favourite of Chaou Kecn, 3. 2:1.

nasty, 1. 2: 8.; 2. 1:1.; 3. 2: 9.; 4. Hea dynasty, 1. 2: 4.; 2. 1: 1.; 3. 1: 1:1, 9, 13.; 5. 1:6.; 2. 1.; 6. 1: 6.; 3.; 4. 1:2.; 6. 1:6, 7.; 2: 4. 7. 1:22.

Heaou, the duke of Wei, 5. 2: 4. Chow-kung, or the duke of Chow, 2. 1: Heen-kóew Mung, a disciple of Men

1.; 2: 9.; 3. 1:1, 6.; 2: 9.; 4. 2:20.; cius, 5. 1:4. 5. 1:6.; 6. 2:8.

Heu Hing, a heresiarch, 3. 1: 4. Chow, the prince of Ch'in in Confucius' Heun-yuh, a tribe of barbarians, 1. 2: time, 5. 1:8.

3. Chow Seaou, a scholar of Wei, 3. 2:3. Hew, a place in the district of Tang, Chuen-foo, a hill on the north of Ts'e, in the department of Yen-chow, 2. 1. 2: 4.

2:14. Chung-jin, a son of the emperor T'ang, Ho, the name of a river, Yellow River, 5. 1:6.

3. 2:9. Chung-ne, Confucius, 1. 1: 4, 7.; 3. 1: Hoo Heih, a man, name, 1. 1: 7. 4.; 4. 2: 18.

Hwa Chow, an officer of Tste, slain in Ch'ung Yu, a disciple of Mencius, 2. 2: battle, 6. 2:6. 7, 13.

Hwae, the name of a stream, 3. 1: 4.; Chuy-keih, a place in Tsin, famous for 2:9. gems, 5. 1: 9.

Hwan, Hwan Tuy, a high officer of Chwang, a street in the capital of Tsée, Sung, 5. 1: 8. 3. 2:6.

Hwan, the duke of Ts'e, B. C. 683–642., Chwang Paou, a minister at the court 1. 1: 7.; 2: 2.; 4. 2:21.; 6. 2: 7. of T'se, 1. 2:1.

Hwan-taou, Yaou's minister of instrucConfucius, 2. 1:144.; 3. 1: 4.; 2: 1, tion, 5. 1:3.

3, 7, 9.; 4. 1: 2, 7, 14.; 2: 18, 21, 22, Hwuy, the posthumous epithet of Yung, 29.; 5. 1: 4, 6, 8.; 2: 1, 4, 7.; 6. 1: king of Leang, a State in Tsin, 1. 1: 6,8.; 2: 3,6.; 7.1: 24.; 2: 17, 19, 37, 1-5.; 7. 2:1. 38.

Hwuy, of Lew-hea, posthumous title E, a famons archer, B. C. 2150, 4. 2: 24.; of Chen Hwo, an officer of Loo, 2. 1: 6. 1: 20.; 7. 1:41.

9.; 5. 2: 1.; 6. 2:6.; 7.1:38.; 2: 15. E Che, a follower of Mih, 3. 1:5. Hwuy, the duke of Pe, 5. 2: 3. E Yin, a minister of T'ang, 2. 1:2.; Jin, a small State, 6. 2: 1,5.

2:2.; 5. 1:6, 7.; 2: 1.; 6. 2:6.; 7. Joo, the name of a stream, 3. 1: 4. 1:31.; 2:38.

Ka, or Ko, a city in Ts'e, 2. 2:6.; 3.2: Fan, a city of Tsée, 7. 1: 36.

10. Fei-leen, å favourite minister of the ty- Kang, younger brother of the prince rant Chow, 3. 2:9.

of T'ang, 7. 1: 43. Foo-hea, a place where Shun dwelt, 4. K'ang, hon. epithet of Fung, brother of 2:1.

king Woo, 5. 2: 4. Foo Yue, the minister of the Emperor Kaou, the philosopher, named Puh-hae, Kaou-tsung, 6. 2: 15.

2. 1: 2.; 6. 1:1-4, 6. Fung-foo, a scholar of Tsin, famous for Kaou, a disciple of Mencius, 2. 2: 12.; seizing tigers, 7. 2: 23.

7. 2:21, 22 Gan, or Ngan, the principal minister of Kaou, a disciple of Tsze-hea, 6. 2:3. Tsée, 1. 2: 4.; 2. 1:1.

Kaou-kih, a distinguished minister of Go-ching or Yo-ching, the double sur- the tyrant Chow, 2. 1: 1.; 6. 2: 15.

name of K‘ih, a disciple of Mencius, Kaou-tang, a place in the west of 1. 2: 16.; 4. 1:24, 25.; 6. 2: 13.; 7. Ts'e, 6. 2: 6. 2:25.

Ke, a mountain in Ho-nan, 6. 1: 6.

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