Translations [from Gr. and Lat. authors], by R.C. Jebb, H. Jackson and W.E. Currey

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sir Richard Claverhouse Jebb
1885

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Page 398 - Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the truest wisdom; and a great empire and little minds go ill together.
Page 354 - And fettered to her eye, The birds that wanton in the air Know no such liberty. When flowing cups run swiftly round With no allaying Thames, Our careless heads with roses bound, Our hearts with loyal flames; When thirsty grief in wine we steep, When healths and draughts go...
Page 358 - Life's night begins : let him never come back to us ! There would be doubt, hesitation and pain, Forced praise on our part — the glimmer of twilight, Never glad confident morning again...
Page 306 - The institutions of policy, the goods of fortune, the gifts of Providence, are handed down to us and from us in the same course and order.
Page 328 - FORTUNE is like the market, where many times, if you can stay a little, the price will fall ; and again, it is sometimes like Sibylla's offer, which at first offereth the commodity at full, then consumeth part and part, and still holdeth up the price...
Page 364 - Still more majestic shalt thou rise, More dreadful from each foreign stroke; As the loud blast that tears the skies Serves but to root thy native oak. Thee haughty tyrants ne'er shall tame; All their attempts to bend thee down Will but arouse thy generous flame, But work their woe and thy renown.
Page 362 - WHEN Britain first, at Heaven's command, Arose from out the azure main, This was the charter of the land, And guardian angels sung this strain : ' Rule, Britannia, rule the waves, Britons never will be slaves.
Page 356 - LOST LEADER. JUST for a handful of silver he left us, Just for a riband to stick in his coat — Found the one gift of which fortune bereft us, Lost all the others she lets us devote ; They, with the gold to give, doled him out silver, So much was theirs who so little allowed : How all our copper had gone for his service ! Rags — were they purple, his heart had...
Page 312 - Aristotle has brought to explain his doctrine of substantial forms, when he tells us that a statue lies hid in a block of marble ; and that the art of the statuary only clears away the superfluous matter, and removes the rubbish. The figure is in the stone, the sculptor only finds it. What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to a human soul.
Page 358 - ... his presence; Songs may inspirit us, — not from his lyre; Deeds will be done, — while he boasts his quiescence, Still bidding crouch whom the rest bade aspire...

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