A Treatise on the Progressive Improvement and Present State of the Manufactures in Metal, Volume 2

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1833 - Ironwork
 

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Page 21 - For while with their knife which they hold in one hand they cut the meat out of the dish, they fasten their fork which they hold in their other hand upon the same dish, so that whatsoever he be that sitting in the company of any others at...
Page 22 - I myself thought good to imitate the Italian fashion by this forked cutting of meat, not only while I was in Italy, but also in Germany, and oftentimes in England since I came home...
Page 22 - This form of feeding I understand is generally used in all places of Italy, their forks being for the most part made of iron or steel, and some of silver, but those are used only by gentlemen.
Page 21 - Italian, and also most strangers that are commorant in Italy, do always at their meals use a little fork when they cut their meat.
Page 3 - As dwarfs upon knights-errant do : It was a serviceable dudgeon, Either for fighting or for drudging : When it had stabb'd or broke a head, It would scrape trenchers, or chip bread ; Toast cheese or bacon, though it were To bait a mousetrap, 'twould not care : 'Twould make clean shoes, and in the earth Set leeks and onions, and so forth : It had been 'prentice to a brewer, Where this and more it did endure, But left the trade, as many more Have lately done on the same score. In th...
Page 160 - One is, the multitude of chimneys lately erected ; whereas, in their young days, there were not above two or three, if so many, in most uplandish towns of the realm...
Page 22 - Italy, their forkes being for the most part made of iron or steele, and some of silver, but those are used only by gentlemen. The reason of this their curiosity is because the Italian cannot by any means indure to have his dish touched with fingers, seeing all men's fingers are not alike cleane.
Page 21 - I passed, that is not used in any other country that I saw in my travels ; neither do I think that any other nation of Christendome doth use it, but only Italy.
Page 281 - ... 70. A key with a rose-turning pipe, and two roses pierced through endwise the bit thereof, with several handsomely contrived wards, which may likewise do the same effects.

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