Summa Theologica, Volume 3 (Part II, Second Section)

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Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2013 - Religion - 640 pages
"The Summa Theologica is the best-known work of Italian philosopher, scholar, and Dominican friar SAINT THOMAS AQUINAS (1225 1274), widely considered the Catholic Church s greatest theologian. Famously consulted (immediately after the Bible) on religious questions at the Council of Trent, Aquinas s masterpiece has been considered a summary of official Church philosophy ever since. Aquinas considers approximately 10,000 questions on Church doctrine covering the roles and nature of God, man, and Jesus, then lays out objections to Church teachings and systematically confronts each, using Biblical verses, theologians, and philosophers to bolster his arguments. In Volume III, Aquinas addresses: faith and heresy charity peace and war mercy, anger, and justice prayer truth and much more. This massive work of scholarship, spanning five volumes, addresses just about every possible query or argument that any believer or atheist could have, and remains essential, more than seven hundred years after it was written, for clergy, religious historians, and serious students of Catholic thought."

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Contents

Question
1163
Of Heresy
1218
Ghost
1227
Of the Precepts of Faith Knowl
1234
Of the Precepts RelatingitoHope
1259
Opposed
1378
tn uuuiuiux 01
1385
Of the Gift of Counsel
1406
Of Respect of Persons
1456
Of Injuries Committed on
1466
Of Theft ar1d Robbcry
1476
Of Sins Committed Against justice
1483
Of Reviling
1494
Of TaleBearing
1502
Of the Sin of Usury
1512
Question Page Question
1581

Of Vices Opposed to Prudence
1415
Of the Precepts Relating to Pru
1421
Of Injustice
1437
Of the Parts of justice
1445
Of Superstition Consisting in Un 123 O1 110111111111
1587
Of Observance Considered in It 133 O1 P1151113jm1m11Y
1629
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Popular passages

Page 1379 - Let no man deceive himself. If any man among you seemeth to be wise in this world, let him become a fool, that he may be wise.
Page 1604 - For I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which all your adversaries shall not be able to gainsay nor resist.
Page 1618 - LET a man so account of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God.
Page 1187 - For we know in part, and we prophesy in part; but when that which is perfect is come, that which is in part shall be done away.
Page 1296 - Behold, the third time I am ready to come to you ; and I will not be burdensome to you : for I seek not yours, but you. For the children ought not to lay up for the parents, but the parents for the children.
Page 1176 - For the invisible things of him, from the creation of the world, are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made: his eternal power also, and divinity, so that they are inexcusable.
Page 1366 - Give not that which is holy to dogs; neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest perhaps they trample them under their feet, and turning upon you, they tear you.
Page 1173 - Simon, Simon, behold Satan hath desired to have you, that he may sift you as wheat: but I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not; and thou, being once converted, confirm thy brethren.
Page 1594 - God, and could not out of the good things that are seen, know him that is : neither by considering the works did they acknowledge the workmaster ; but deemed either fire, or wind, or the swift air, or the circle of the stars, or the violent water, or the lights of heaven, to be the gods which govern the world.

About the author (2013)

Thomas Aquinas, the most noted philosopher of the Middle Ages, was born near Naples, Italy, to the Count of Aquino and Theodora of Naples. As a young man he determined, in spite of family opposition to enter the new Order of Saint Dominic. He did so in 1244. Thomas Aquinas was a fairly radical Aristotelian. He rejected any form of special illumination from God in ordinary intellectual knowledge. He stated that the soul is the form of the body, the body having no form independent of that provided by the soul itself. He held that the intellect was sufficient to abstract the form of a natural object from its sensory representations and thus the intellect was sufficient in itself for natural knowledge without God's special illumination. He rejected the Averroist notion that natural reason might lead individuals correctly to conclusions that would turn out false when one takes revealed doctrine into account. Aquinas wrote more than sixty important works. The Summa Theologica is considered his greatest work. It is the doctrinal foundation for all teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

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