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dissatisfied-moved me to the resolution of undertaking this larger work. I knew that the time was not come, or that I was certainly not the man, to tell the whole story of a life which appeared the more wonderful the more it was contemplated; but to the production of such a memorial as this,-modest in pretension, however difficult in execution; catholic and independent, fervent though free,-I felt that public sentiment was not unfriendly, nor myself ill-fitted.

In the fulfilment of my purpose, I have received essential aid from the family and some friends of Mr. Irving-especially from the Rev. J. L. Miller, who was gratefully associated in my oldest memories with him; and whose recovered friendship, with that of Mrs. Irving, her son, and daughter (alas! there were but lately two sisters), I count more than a compensation for any displeasure of religious sentiment unavoidably offended. But while to them I owe these thanks, mine alone, be it understood, is the responsibility for all statements and opinions herein contained. I hope there will be found, however, no graver error— the plan and spirit of the performance being accepted -than the occasional misplace of a comma, or other artistic blemish, which must displease my reader less than it can displease myself.

Holloway, October, 1854.

W. W.

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Ꭼ Ꭰ Ꮃ Ꭺ Ꭱ Ꭰ IRVING.

CHAPTER I.

THE MAN IN PREPARATION.

ON the north side, and nearly at the top, of that beautiful estuary the Solway Frith-oppo- Annan. site to the ancient city of Carlisle, and within a few miles of the famed Gretna Green-is the little seaport and market-town of Annan. The port is constituted of a quay, a wooden pier, and a few cottages. The town is about two miles from the landing-place, and upon the east bank of the river from which it, as well as the surrounding district, Annandale, takes its name. The southernmost point of Scotland, and one of its most inviting portions, Annandale, was honoured by the occupation of those fastidious conquerors who, as Gibbon tells us, turned with contempt from a country of lonely heath and gloomy rock; and one of its hills yet retains deep traces of a Roman camp. In later times, it was held as a fief by

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the ancestors of Robert Bruce-and how exposed it was to the incursions of freebooting borderers, the remains of many fortresses still attest. It has, notwithstanding this remote origin and these romantic associations, no recent history; but is a modest little place-visited twice or thrice a day by railway trains; doing a quiet coasting-trade in its own score or two of vessels; supporting one portion of its four thousand people by cotton manufactories, and another portion by taking the salmon which abound at the mouth of its clear broad stream; altogether so like an English town, that one is only reminded he is over the border by reading the great names of Carlyle, Chalmers, Cunningham, and Irving, over the front of many little shops.

Irving's birth.

He who has given a celebrity wide and lasting as English and German literature, to the first of these names, was born in Annandalethat possessor of the last with whom we have to do, was born in the town of Annan, on the 15th of August, 1792, in a house that is still standing, and that any of the older townsfolks will point out to an inquire; a square, stone-built, double-bodied' house, of modest dimensions; hard by the parish church, and what remains of the town cross.

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Edward Irving's paternal ancestors are said to have come, at the distance of a few generations, His family. from France-and his mother was of a family of Louthers, reported to have been descended from Martin Luther, the Reformer. His father was a tanner, and seems to have prospered so well in his

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