First Lessons in Philology

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Jones brothers, 1878 - English language - 142 pages

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Page 95 - Her finger was so small, the ring Would not stay on, which they did bring, It was too wide a peck; And to say truth (for out it must) It looked like the great collar (.just) About our young colt's neck. Her feet beneath her petticoat, Like little mice, stole in and out, As if they feared the light.
Page 96 - He wrote, as he tells us, with very little consideration ; when occasion or necessity called upon him, he poured out what the present moment happened to supply^ and, when once it had passed the press, ejected it from his mind ; for when he had no pecuniary interest, he had no further solicitude. Pope was not content to satisfy ; he desired to excel, and therefore always endeavored to do his best: he did not court the candor, but dared the judgment of his reader, and, expecting no indulgence from...
Page 96 - Youth is not rich in time, it may be poor ; Part with it as with money, sparing ; pay No moment, but in purchase of its worth ; And what its worth, ask death-beds ; they can tell.
Page 116 - THE night has a thousand eyes, And the day but one; Yet the light of the bright world dies With the dying sun. The mind has a thousand eyes, And the heart but one; Yet the light of a whole life dies When love is done.
Page 97 - The ocean old, Centuries old, Strong as youth, and as uncontrolled, Paces restless to and fro, Up and down the sands of gold. His beating heart is not at rest ; And far and wide, With ceaseless flow, His beard of snow Heaves with the heaving of his breast.
Page 95 - God grant mine eyes may never behold the like, who now saw above 10,000 houses all in one flame ! The noise and cracking and thunder of the impetuous flames, the shrieking of women and children, the hurry of people, the fall of towers, houses, and churches, was like a hideous storm; and the air all about so hot and inflamed, that at the last one was not able to approach it, so that they were forced to stand still, and let the flames burn on, which they did, for near two miles in length and one in...
Page 74 - Ther nas no dore that he nolde heve of harre, 550 Or breke it, at a renning, with his heed. His berd as any sowe or fox was reed, And ther-to brood, as though it were a spade. Up-on the cop...
Page 97 - Soldier hops painfully along, begging alms: a thousand carriages, and wains, and cars, come tumbling-in with Food, with young Rusticity, and other Raw Produce, inanimate or animate, and go tumbling out again with Produce manufactured. That living flood, pouring through these streets, of all qualities and ages, knowest thou whence it is coming, whither it is going? Aus der Ewigkeit; zu der Ewigkeit hin: From Eternity, onwards to Eternity!
Page 95 - Her cheeks so rare a white was on ; No daisy makes comparison, Who sees them is undone. For streaks of red were mingled there, Such as are on a Katherine pear (The side that's next the sun). Her lips were red, and one was thin Compared to that was next her chin (Some bee had stung it newly). But, Dick, her eyes so guard her face, I durst no more upon them gaze, Than on the sun in July.
Page 93 - The most excellent Historic of the Merchant of Venice. With • the extreame crueltie of Shylocke the lewe towards the sayd Merchant, in cutting a iust pound of his flesh : and the obtayning of Portia by the choyse of three chests. As it hath beene diuers times acted by the Lord Chamberlaine his Seruants. Written by William Shakespeare. At London, Printed by IR, for Thomas Heyes, and are to be sold in Paules Church-yard, at the signe of the Greene Dragon, 1600.

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