Genomics and Bioinformatics: An Introduction to Programming Tools for Life Scientists

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 7, 2012 - Computers - 338 pages
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With the arrival of genomics and genome sequencing projects, biology has been transformed into an incredibly data-rich science. The vast amount of information generated has made computational analysis critical and has increased demand for skilled bioinformaticians. Designed for biologists without previous programming experience, this textbook provides a hands-on introduction to Unix, Perl and other tools used in sequence bioinformatics. Relevant biological topics are used throughout the book and are combined with practical bioinformatics examples, leading students through the process from biological problem to computational solution. All of the Perl scripts, sequence and database files used in the book are available for download at the accompanying website, allowing the reader to easily follow each example using their own computer. Programming examples are kept at an introductory level, avoiding complex mathematics that students often find daunting. The book demonstrates that even simple programs can provide powerful solutions to many complex bioinformatics problems.
 

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Contents

Genes and genomes
7
Early days of restriction enzymes
20
12
29
functions and applications
34
Reverse translation
48
Exercises
54
14
62
18
64
Changes in EOXP2 specific to humans
101
Examination of the criminal case
113
Exercises
120
details of family genetics l
266
Where are the crossingover sites?
272
brief Unix reference I
278
a selection of biological sequence analysis
289
a short Perl reference I
300

Exercises
65
Exercises
72
BLAST
81
Exercises
90
a brief introduction to R
323
Index
330
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About the author (2012)

Tore Samuelsson is a Professor in Biochemistry and Bioinformatics at the Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. He has been active in bioinformatics research for more than fifteen years and has over ten years' experience of teaching in the field, including the development of web resources for molecular biology and bioinformatics education.

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